register interest

Professor Alison Simmons

Research Area: Immunology
Technology Exchange: Bioinformatics, Computational biology, Drug discovery, Mass spectrometry, Microscopy (Confocal), Protein interaction, SNP typing and Transcript profiling
Scientific Themes: Immunology & Infectious Disease
Keywords: innate immunity, signaling, commensal, Crohn's disease, mucosal immunology, single cell RNA Seq, Inflammatory bowel disease, mesenchyme and epithelia
Web Links:

Innate Immunity in inflammation and Infection

Main Research Aims:

We are focused on defining innate immune pathways underpinning digestive disease and developing novel therapeutic approaches.

Current Research Themes:

Mechanisms of pattern recognition receptor function in health and inflammation

Pattern recognition receptors are families of ancient immune receptors conserved through evolution that recognize conserved molecular motifs present on microorganisms. Signaling through PRRs expressed in antigen presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DCs) dictates the nature of DC maturation and the phenotype of the ensuing adaptive immune response. This process is a central primary gatekeeper function of the immune response; correctly targeted signaling through PRRs results in timely clearance of infections and immune homeostasis. When dysregulated, aberrant innate signaling triggers inflammation. It is increasingly recognized the pathogenesis of many human diseases results from defects in innate sensing. The labs chief focus is on using large-scale molecular techniques in human cell systems to define how innate sensing occurs normally and how this breaks down in disease. 

Molecular redefinition of human intestinal cells in health and digestive disease

We are utilizing single cell technologies to define intestinal subsets and characterize novel populations associated with gastrointestinal diseases including subsets of inflammatory bowel disease, GI cancer and infections of the gastrointestinal tract such as Salmonella. We utilize this information to characterize novel pathways driving immune pathology in these conditions and to inform in vivo studies defining the role of distinct subsets in immunity.

Improving the treatment and management of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

We have various drug and biomarker discovery programmes in IBD ongoing with the aim of defining subsets of patients amenable to novel therapeutic approaches. Members of the lab have identified compounds that modulate immune defects observed in IBD that are being functionally validated and tested in vivo for their utility in attenuating colitis. This work is supported by collaborations with various pharmaceutical companies and the US Harrington Discovery Institute.

There are no collaborations listed for this principal investigator.

Kinchen J, Chen HH, Parikh K, Antanaviciute A, Jagielowicz M, Fawkner-Corbett D, Ashley N, Cubitt L, Mellado-Gomez E, Attar M et al. 2018. Structural Remodeling of the Human Colonic Mesenchyme in Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Cell, 175 (2), pp. 372-386.e17. | Show Abstract | Read more

Intestinal mesenchymal cells play essential roles in epithelial homeostasis, matrix remodeling, immunity, and inflammation. But the extent of heterogeneity within the colonic mesenchyme in these processes remains unknown. Using unbiased single-cell profiling of over 16,500 colonic mesenchymal cells, we reveal four subsets of fibroblasts expressing divergent transcriptional regulators and functional pathways, in addition to pericytes and myofibroblasts. We identified a niche population located in proximity to epithelial crypts expressing SOX6, F3 (CD142), and WNT genes essential for colonic epithelial stem cell function. In colitis, we observed dysregulation of this niche and emergence of an activated mesenchymal population. This subset expressed TNF superfamily member 14 (TNFSF14), fibroblastic reticular cell-associated genes, IL-33, and Lysyl oxidases. Further, it induced factors that impaired epithelial proliferation and maturation and contributed to oxidative stress and disease severity in vivo. Our work defines how the colonic mesenchyme remodels to fuel inflammation and barrier dysfunction in IBD.

Gibani MM, Voysey M, Jin C, Jones C, Thomaides-Brears H, Jones E, Baker P, Morgan M, Simmons A, Gordon MA et al. 2018. The Impact of Vaccination and Prior Exposure on Stool Shedding of Salmonella Typhi and Salmonella Paratyphi in 6 Controlled Human Infection Studies. Clin Infect Dis, | Show Abstract | Read more

Background: Shedding of Salmonella Typhi or Paratyphi in the stool or urine leads to contamination of food or water, which is a prerequisite for transmission of enteric fever. Currently, there are limited data on the effect of vaccination or prior exposure on stool shedding. Methods: Six Salmonella Typhi or Paratyphi human challenge studies were conducted between 2011 and 2017. Participants were either unvaccinated or vaccinated with 1 of 4 vaccines: Vi-polysaccharide (Vi-PS), Vi-tetanus-toxoid conjugate vaccine (Vi-TT), live oral Ty21a vaccine, or an experimental vaccine (M01ZH09). Daily stool cultures were collected for 14 days after challenge. Results: There were 4934 stool samples collected from 430 volunteers. Participants who received Vi-PS or Vi-TT shed less than unvaccinated participants (odds ratio [OR], 0.34; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.15-0.77; P = .010 and OR, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.19-0.91, P = .029 for Vi-PS and Vi-TT, respectively). Higher anti-Vi immunoglobulin G titers were associated with less shedding of S. Typhi (P < .0001). A nonsignificant reduction in shedding was associated with Ty21a vaccine (OR, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.27-1.20; P = .140). Individuals previously exposed to S. Typhi shed less than previously unexposed individuals (OR, 0.30; 95% CI, 0.1-0.8; P = .016). Shedding of S. Typhi was more common than S. Paratyphi. Conclusions: Prior vaccination with Vi vaccines, or natural infection, reduces onward transmission of S. Typhi. Field trials of Vi-TT should be designed to detect indirect protection, reflecting the consequence of reduced stool shedding observed in the human challenge model.

Probert F, Walsh A, Jagielowicz M, Yeo T, Claridge TDW, Simmons A, Travis S, Anthony DC. 2018. Plasma Nuclear Magnetic Resonance metabolomics discriminates between high and low endoscopic activity and predicts progression in a prospective cohort of patients with ulcerative colitis. J Crohns Colitis, | Show Abstract | Read more

Background & aims: Endoscopic assessment of ulcerative colitis (UC) is one of the most accurate measures of disease activity, but frequent endoscopic investigations are disliked by patients and expensive for the health care system. A minimally-invasive test that provides a surrogate measure of endoscopic activity is required. Methods: Plasma Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectra from 40 patients with UC followed prospectively over 6 months were analysed with multivariate statistics. NMR metabolite profiles were compared with endoscopic (Ulcerative Colitis Endoscopic Index of Severity: UCEIS), histological (Nancy Index), and clinical (Simple Clinical Colitis Activity Index: SCCAI) severity indices, along with routine blood measurements. Results: A blinded principal component analysis spontaneously separated metabolite profiles of patients with low (≤3) and high (>3) UCEIS. Orthogonal partial least squares discrimination analysis identified low and high UCEIS metabolite profiles with an accuracy of 77±5%. Plasma metabolites driving discrimination included decreases in lipoproteins and increases in isoleucine, valine, glucose, and myo-inositol in high compared to low UCEIS. This same metabolite profile distinguished between low (Nancy 0-1) and high histological activity (Nancy 3-4) with a modest though significant accuracy (65±6%) but was independent of SCCAI and all blood parameters measured. A different metabolite profile, dominated by changes in lysine, histidine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine, distinguished between improvement in UCEIS (decrease >1) and worsening (increase >1) over 6 months with an accuracy of 74±4%. Conclusion: Plasma NMR metabolite analysis has the potential to provide a low-cost, minimally invasive technique that may be a surrogate for endoscopic assessment, with predictive capacity.

Napolitani G, Kurupati P, Teng KWW, Gibani MM, Rei M, Aulicino A, Preciado-Llanes L, Wong MT, Becht E, Howson L et al. 2018. Clonal analysis of Salmonella-specific effector T cells reveals serovar-specific and cross-reactive T cell responses. Nat Immunol, 19 (7), pp. 742-754. | Show Abstract | Read more

To tackle the complexity of cross-reactive and pathogen-specific T cell responses against related Salmonella serovars, we used mass cytometry, unbiased single-cell cloning, live fluorescence barcoding, and T cell-receptor sequencing to reconstruct the Salmonella-specific repertoire of circulating effector CD4+ T cells, isolated from volunteers challenged with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) or Salmonella Paratyphi A (S. Paratyphi). We describe the expansion of cross-reactive responses against distantly related Salmonella serovars and of clonotypes recognizing immunodominant antigens uniquely expressed by S. Typhi or S. Paratyphi A. In addition, single-amino acid variations in two immunodominant proteins, CdtB and PhoN, lead to the accumulation of T cells that do not cross-react against the different serovars, thus demonstrating how minor sequence variations in a complex microorganism shape the pathogen-specific T cell repertoire. Our results identify immune-dominant, serovar-specific, and cross-reactive T cell antigens, which should aid in the design of T cell-vaccination strategies against Salmonella.

Kurioka A, Cosgrove C, Simoni Y, van Wilgenburg B, Geremia A, Björkander S, Sverremark-Ekström E, Thurnheer C, Günthard HF, Khanna N et al. 2018. CD161 Defines a Functionally Distinct Subset of Pro-Inflammatory Natural Killer Cells. Front Immunol, 9 (APR), pp. 486. | Show Abstract | Read more

CD161 is a C-type lectin-like receptor expressed on the majority of natural killer (NK) cells; however, the significance of CD161 expression on NK cells has not been comprehensively investigated. Recently, we found that CD161 expression identifies a transcriptional and innate functional phenotype that is shared across various T cell populations. Using mass cytometry and microarray experiments, we demonstrate that this functional phenotype extends to NK cells. CD161 marks NK cells that have retained the ability to respond to innate cytokines during their differentiation, and is lost upon cytomegalovirus-induced maturation in both healthy and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. These pro-inflammatory NK cells are present in the inflamed lamina propria where they are enriched for integrin CD103 expression. Thus, CD161 expression identifies NK cells that may contribute to inflammatory disease pathogenesis and correlates with an innate responsiveness to cytokines in both T and NK cells.

Corridoni D, Chapman T, Ambrose T, Simmons A. 2018. Emerging Mechanisms of Innate Immunity and Their Translational Potential in Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Front Med (Lausanne), 5 (FEB), pp. 32. | Show Abstract | Read more

Activation of the innate immune system through pattern-recognition receptor (PRR) signaling plays a pivotal role in the early induction of host defense following exposure to pathogens. Loss of intestinal innate immune regulation leading aberrant immune responses has been implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The precise role of PRRs in gut inflammation is not well understood, but considering their role as bacterial sensors and their genetic association with IBD, they likely contribute to dysregulated immune responses to the commensal microbiota. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the emerging functions of PRRs including their functional cross-talk, how they respond to mitochondrial damage, induce mitophagy or autophagy, and influence adaptive immune responses by interacting with the antigen presentation machinery. The review also summarizes some of the recent attempts to harness these pathways for therapeutic approaches in intestinal inflammation.

Kennedy NA, Lamb CA, Berry SH, Walker AW, Mansfield J, Parkes M, Simpkins R, Tremelling M, Nutland S, UK IBD Genetics Consortium et al. 2018. The Impact of NOD2 Variants on Fecal Microbiota in Crohn's Disease and Controls Without Gastrointestinal Disease. Inflamm Bowel Dis, 24 (3), pp. 583-592. | Show Abstract | Read more

Background/Aims: Current models of Crohn's disease (CD) describe an inappropriate immune response to gut microbiota in genetically susceptible individuals. NOD2 variants are strongly associated with development of CD, and NOD2 is part of the innate immune response to bacteria. This study aimed to identify differences in fecal microbiota in CD patients and non-IBD controls stratified by NOD2 genotype. Methods: Patients with CD and non-IBD controls of known NOD2 genotype were identified from patients in previous UK IBD genetics studies and the Cambridge bioresource (genotyped/phenotyped volunteers). Individuals with known CD-associated NOD2 mutations were matched to those with wild-type genotype. We obtained fecal samples from patients in clinical remission with low fecal calprotectin (<250 µg/g) and controls without gastrointestinal disease. After extracting DNA, the V1-2 region of 16S rRNA genes were polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified and sequenced. Analysis was undertaken using the mothur package. Volatile organic compounds (VOC) were also measured. Results: Ninety-one individuals were in the primary analysis (37 CD, 30 bioresource controls, and 24 household controls). Comparing CD with nonIBD controls, there were reductions in bacterial diversity, Ruminococcaceae, Rikenellaceae, and Christensenellaceae and an increase in Enterobacteriaceae. No significant differences could be identified in microbiota by NOD2 genotype, but fecal butanoic acid was higher in Crohn's patients carrying NOD2 mutations. Conclusions: In this well-controlled study of NOD2 genotype and fecal microbiota, we identified no significant genotype-microbiota associations. This suggests that the changes associated with NOD2 genotype might only be seen at the mucosal level, or that environmental factors and prior inflammation are the predominant determinant of the observed dysbiosis in gut microbiota.

Attar M, Sharma E, Li S, Bryer C, Cubitt L, Broxholme J, Lockstone H, Kinchen J, Simmons A, Piazza P et al. 2018. A practical solution for preserving single cells for RNA sequencing. Sci Rep, 8 (1), pp. 2151. | Show Abstract | Read more

The design and implementation of single-cell experiments is often limited by their requirement for fresh starting material. We have adapted a method for histological tissue fixation using dithio-bis(succinimidyl propionate) (DSP), or Lomant's Reagent, to stabilise cell samples for single-cell transcriptomic applications. DSP is a reversible cross-linker of free amine groups that has previously been shown to preserve tissue integrity for histology while maintaining RNA integrity and yield in bulk RNA extractions. Although RNA-seq data from DSP-fixed single cells appears to be prone to characteristic artefacts, such as slightly reduced yield of cDNA and a detectable 3' bias in comparison with fresh cells, cell preservation using DSP does not appear to substantially reduce RNA complexity at the gene level. In addition, there is evidence that instantaneous fixation of cells can reduce inter-cell technical variability. The ability of DSP-fixed cells to retain commonly used dyes, such as propidium iodide, enables the tracking of experimental sub-populations and the recording of cell viability at the point of fixation. Preserving cells using DSP will remove several barriers in the staging of single-cell experiments, including the transport of samples and the scheduling of shared equipment for downstream single-cell isolation and processing.

Bao L, Hannon C, Cruz-Mignoni A, Ptchelkine D, Sun M-Y, Miller A, Bunjobpol W, Quevedo CE, Derveni M, Chambers J et al. 2017. Intracellular immunization against HIV infection with an intracellular antibody that mimics HIV integrase binding to the cellular LEDGF protein. Sci Rep, 7 (1), pp. 16869. | Show Abstract | Read more

Preventing the protein-protein interaction of the cellular chromatin binding protein Lens Epithelium-Derived Growth Factor (LEDGF) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integrase is an important possible strategy for anti-viral treatment for AIDS. We have used Intracellular Antibody Capture technology to isolate a single VH antibody domain that binds to LEDGF. The crystal structure of the LEDGF-VH complex reveals that the single domain antibody mimics the effect of binding of HIV integrase to LEDGF which is crucial for HIV propagation. CD4-expressing T cell lines were constructed to constitutively express the LEDGF-binding VH and these cells showed interference with HIV viral replication, assayed by virus capsid protein p24 production. Therefore, pre-conditioning cells to express antibody fragments confers effective intracellular immunization for preventing chronic viral replication and can be a way to prevent HIV spread in infected patients. This raises the prospect that intracellular immunization strategies that focus on cellular components of viral integrase protein interactions can be used to combat the problems associated with latent HIV virus re-emergence in patients. New genome editing development, such as using CRISPR/cas9, offer the prospect intracellularly immunized T cells in HIV+ patients.

Wildenberg ME, Levin AD, Ceroni A, Guo Z, Koelink PJ, Hakvoort TBM, Westera L, Bloemendaal FM, Brandse JF, Simmons A et al. 2017. Benzimidazoles Promote Anti-TNF Mediated Induction of Regulatory Macrophages and Enhance Therapeutic Efficacy in a Murine Model. J Crohns Colitis, 11 (12), pp. 1480-1490. | Show Abstract | Read more

Background and Aims: Regulatory macrophages play a critical role in tissue repair, and we have previously shown that anti-tumour necrosis factor [TNF] antibodies induce these macrophages in vitro and in vivo in IBD patients. The induction of regulatory macrophages can be potentiated using the combination of anti-TNF and thiopurines, consistent with the enhanced efficacy of this combination therapy described in clinical trials. As thiopurines are unfortunately associated with significant side effects, we here aimed to identify alternatives for combination therapy with anti-TNF, using the macrophage induction model as a screening tool. Methods: Mixed lymphocyte reactions were treated with anti-TNF and a library of 1600 drug compounds. Induction of CD14+CD206+ macrophages was analysed by flow cytometry. Positive hits were validated in vitro and in the T cell transfer model of colitis. Results: Among the 98 compounds potentiating the induction of regulatory macrophages by anti-TNF were six benzimidazoles, including albendazole. Albendazole treatment in the presence of anti-TNF resulted in alterations in the tubulin skeleton and signalling though AMPK, which was required for the enhanced induction. Combination therapy also increased expression levels of the immunoregulatory cytokine IL-10. In vivo, albendazole plus anti-TNF combination therapy was superior to monotherapy in a model of colitis, in terms of both induction of regulatory macrophages and improvement of clinical symptoms. Conclusions: Albendazole enhances the induction of regulatory macrophages by anti-TNF and potentiates clinical efficacy in murine colitis. Given its favourable safety profile, these data indicate that the repurposing of albendazole may be a novel option for anti-TNF combination therapy in IBD.

Corridoni D, Simmons A. 2017. Innate immune receptors for cross-presentation: The expanding role of NLRs. Mol Immunol, | Show Abstract | Read more

A critical role of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) is to influence adaptive immune responses by regulating antigen presentation. Engagement of PRRs in dendritic cells (DCs) increases MHC class I antigen presentation and CD8+ T-cell activation by cross-presented peptides but the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects are not completely understood. Studies looking at the role of PRRs in cross-presentation have been largely limited to TLRs but the role of other PRRs such as cytosolic nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like (NOD-like) receptors remains particularly enigmatic. Here we discuss recent evidence of the role of PRRs on cross-presentation and consider how cytosolic NLR-associated pathways, such as NOD2, may integrate these signals resulting in effective adaptive CD8+ T cells responses.

Fawkner-Corbett D, Simmons A, Parikh K. 2017. Microbiome, pattern recognition receptor function in health and inflammation. Best Pract Res Clin Gastroenterol, 31 (6), pp. 683-691. | Show Abstract | Read more

The innate immune system plays an important role in shaping the microbiota into configurations that are tolerated and beneficial to the host, thereby playing a crucial role in human health. Innate immunity is based on the fundamental principle that Pattern Recognition Receptors (PRRs) recognise pathogen associated molecular patterns as non-self-entities and trigger intracellular signalling pathways that lead to the induction of numerous cytokines and chemokines that help maintain host resistance to infections. Dysregulation of this interaction has been identified as the core defect that leads to chronic intestinal inflammation allowing certain microbiota to be harmful to host health. This dysbiosis of the microbiome is found associated with numerous chronic diseases. A logical explanation would be that genetic defects in the recognition and response pathways that the host uses to identify these microbial pathogens could lead to altered microbial colonisation or mis-recognition of normal bacteria leading to diseases. The interaction between pattern recognition receptors, microbial traits and human health with respect to the gut are now rapidly resolved and will be the subject of this review.

Hegazy AN, West NR, Stubbington MJT, Wendt E, Suijker KIM, Datsi A, This S, Danne C, Campion S, Duncan SH et al. 2017. Circulating and Tissue-Resident CD4+ T Cells With Reactivity to Intestinal Microbiota Are Abundant in Healthy Individuals and Function Is Altered During Inflammation. Gastroenterology, 153 (5), pp. 1320-1337.e16. | Show Abstract | Read more

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Interactions between commensal microbes and the immune system are tightly regulated and maintain intestinal homeostasis, but little is known about these interactions in humans. We investigated responses of human CD4+ T cells to the intestinal microbiota. We measured the abundance of T cells in circulation and intestinal tissues that respond to intestinal microbes and determined their clonal diversity. We also assessed their functional phenotypes and effects on intestinal resident cell populations, and studied alterations in microbe-reactive T cells in patients with chronic intestinal inflammation. METHODS: We collected samples of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and intestinal tissues from healthy individuals (controls, n = 13-30) and patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (n = 119; 59 with ulcerative colitis and 60 with Crohn's disease). We used 2 independent assays (CD154 detection and carboxy-fluorescein succinimidyl ester dilution assays) and 9 intestinal bacterial species (Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium animalis subsp lactis, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Bacteroides vulgatus, Roseburia intestinalis, Ruminococcus obeum, Salmonella typhimurium, and Clostridium difficile) to quantify, expand, and characterize microbe-reactive CD4+ T cells. We sequenced T-cell receptor Vβ genes in expanded microbe-reactive T-cell lines to determine their clonal diversity. We examined the effects of microbe-reactive CD4+ T cells on intestinal stromal and epithelial cell lines. Cytokines, chemokines, and gene expression patterns were measured by flow cytometry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: Circulating and gut-resident CD4+ T cells from controls responded to bacteria at frequencies of 40-4000 per million for each bacterial species tested. Microbiota-reactive CD4+ T cells were mainly of a memory phenotype, present in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and intestinal tissue, and had a diverse T-cell receptor Vβ repertoire. These cells were functionally heterogeneous, produced barrier-protective cytokines, and stimulated intestinal stromal and epithelial cells via interleukin 17A, interferon gamma, and tumor necrosis factor. In patients with inflammatory bowel diseases, microbiota-reactive CD4+ T cells were reduced in the blood compared with intestine; T-cell responses that we detected had an increased frequency of interleukin 17A production compared with responses of T cells from blood or intestinal tissues of controls. CONCLUSIONS: In an analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and intestinal tissues from patients with inflammatory bowel diseases vs controls, we found that reactivity to intestinal bacteria is a normal property of the human CD4+ T-cell repertoire, and does not necessarily indicate disrupted interactions between immune cells and the commensal microbiota. T-cell responses to commensals might support intestinal homeostasis, by producing barrier-protective cytokines and providing a large pool of T cells that react to pathogens.

Schwerd T, Bryant RV, Pandey S, Capitani M, Meran L, Cazier J-B, Jung J, Mondal K, Parkes M, Mathew CG et al. 2018. NOX1 loss-of-function genetic variants in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Mucosal Immunol, 11 (2), pp. 562-574. | Show Abstract | Read more

Genetic defects that affect intestinal epithelial barrier function can present with very early-onset inflammatory bowel disease (VEOIBD). Using whole-genome sequencing, a novel hemizygous defect in NOX1 encoding NAPDH oxidase 1 was identified in a patient with ulcerative colitis-like VEOIBD. Exome screening of 1,878 pediatric patients identified further seven male inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients with rare NOX1 mutations. Loss-of-function was validated in p.N122H and p.T497A, and to a lesser degree in p.Y470H, p.R287Q, p.I67M, p.Q293R as well as the previously described p.P330S, and the common NOX1 SNP p.D360N (rs34688635) variant. The missense mutation p.N122H abrogated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in cell lines, ex vivo colonic explants, and patient-derived colonic organoid cultures. Within colonic crypts, NOX1 constitutively generates a high level of ROS in the crypt lumen. Analysis of 9,513 controls and 11,140 IBD patients of non-Jewish European ancestry did not reveal an association between p.D360N and IBD. Our data suggest that loss-of-function variants in NOX1 do not cause a Mendelian disorder of high penetrance but are a context-specific modifier. Our results implicate that variants in NOX1 change brush border ROS within colonic crypts at the interface between the epithelium and luminal microbes.

Zinecker H, Ouaret D, Ebner D, Gaidt MM, Taylor S, Aulicino A, Jagielowicz M, Hornung V, Simmons A. 2017. ICG-001 affects DRP1 activity and ER stress correlative with its anti-proliferative effect. Oncotarget, 8 (63), pp. 106764-106777. | Show Abstract | Read more

Mitochondria form a highly dynamic network driven by opposing scission and fusion events. DRP1 is an essential modulator of mitochondrial fission and dynamics within mammalian cells. Its fission activity is regulated by posttranslational modifications such as activating phosphorylation at serine 616. DRP1 activity has recently been implicated as being dysregulated in numerous human disorders such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Here we describe the development of a cell-based screening assay to detect DRP1 activation. We utilized this to undertake focused compound library screening and identified potent modulators that affected DRP1 activity including ICG-001, which is described as WNT/β-catenin signaling inhibitor. Our findings elucidate novel details about ICG-001's mechanism of action (MOA) in mediating anti-proliferative activity. We show ICG-001 both inhibits mitochondrial fission and activates an early endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response to induce cell death in susceptible colorectal cancer cell lines.

Khatamzas E, Hipp MM, Gaughan D, Pichulik T, Leslie A, Fernandes RA, Muraro D, Booth S, Zausmer K, Sun M-Y et al. 2017. Snapin promotes HIV-1 transmission from dendritic cells by dampening TLR8 signaling. EMBO J, 36 (20), pp. 2998-3011. | Show Abstract | Read more

HIV-1 traffics through dendritic cells (DCs) en route to establishing a productive infection in T lymphocytes but fails to induce an innate immune response. Within DC endosomes, HIV-1 somehow evades detection by the pattern-recognition receptor (PRR) Toll-like receptor 8 (TLR8). Using a phosphoproteomic approach, we identified a robust and diverse signaling cascade triggered by HIV-1 upon entry into human DCs. A secondary siRNA screen of the identified signaling factors revealed several new mediators of HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4+ T cells in DCs, including the dynein motor protein Snapin. Inhibition of Snapin enhanced localization of HIV-1 with TLR8+ early endosomes, triggered a pro-inflammatory response, and inhibited trans-infection of CD4+ T cells. Snapin inhibited TLR8 signaling in the absence of HIV-1 and is a general regulator of endosomal maturation. Thus, we identify a new mechanism of innate immune sensing by TLR8 in DCs, which is exploited by HIV-1 to promote transmission.

West NR, Hegazy AN, Owens BMJ, Bullers SJ, Linggi B, Buonocore S, Coccia M, Görtz D, This S, Stockenhuber K et al. 2017. Oncostatin M drives intestinal inflammation and predicts response to tumor necrosis factor-neutralizing therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Nat Med, 23 (5), pp. 579-589. | Show Abstract | Read more

Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), are complex chronic inflammatory conditions of the gastrointestinal tract that are driven by perturbed cytokine pathways. Anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) antibodies are mainstay therapies for IBD. However, up to 40% of patients are nonresponsive to anti-TNF agents, which makes the identification of alternative therapeutic targets a priority. Here we show that, relative to healthy controls, inflamed intestinal tissues from patients with IBD express high amounts of the cytokine oncostatin M (OSM) and its receptor (OSMR), which correlate closely with histopathological disease severity. The OSMR is expressed in nonhematopoietic, nonepithelial intestinal stromal cells, which respond to OSM by producing various proinflammatory molecules, including interleukin (IL)-6, the leukocyte adhesion factor ICAM1, and chemokines that attract neutrophils, monocytes, and T cells. In an animal model of anti-TNF-resistant intestinal inflammation, genetic deletion or pharmacological blockade of OSM significantly attenuates colitis. Furthermore, according to an analysis of more than 200 patients with IBD, including two cohorts from phase 3 clinical trials of infliximab and golimumab, high pretreatment expression of OSM is strongly associated with failure of anti-TNF therapy. OSM is thus a potential biomarker and therapeutic target for IBD, and has particular relevance for anti-TNF-resistant patients.

Lee JC, Biasci D, Roberts R, Gearry RB, Mansfield JC, Ahmad T, Prescott NJ, Satsangi J, Wilson DC, Jostins L et al. 2017. Genome-wide association study identifies distinct genetic contributions to prognosis and susceptibility in Crohn's disease. Nat Genet, 49 (2), pp. 262-268. | Show Abstract | Read more

For most immune-mediated diseases, the main determinant of patient well-being is not the diagnosis itself but instead the course that the disease takes over time (prognosis). Prognosis may vary substantially between patients for reasons that are poorly understood. Familial studies support a genetic contribution to prognosis, but little evidence has been found for a proposed association between prognosis and the burden of susceptibility variants. To better characterize how genetic variation influences disease prognosis, we performed a within-cases genome-wide association study in two cohorts of patients with Crohn's disease. We identified four genome-wide significant loci, none of which showed any association with disease susceptibility. Conversely, the aggregated effect of all 170 disease susceptibility loci was not associated with disease prognosis. Together, these data suggest that the genetic contribution to prognosis in Crohn's disease is largely independent of the contribution to disease susceptibility and point to a biology of prognosis that could provide new therapeutic opportunities.

Luo Y, de Lange KM, Jostins L, Moutsianas L, Randall J, Kennedy NA, Lamb CA, McCarthy S, Ahmad T, Edwards C et al. 2017. Exploring the genetic architecture of inflammatory bowel disease by whole-genome sequencing identifies association at ADCY7. Nat Genet, 49 (2), pp. 186-192. | Show Abstract | Read more

To further resolve the genetic architecture of the inflammatory bowel diseases ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, we sequenced the whole genomes of 4,280 patients at low coverage and compared them to 3,652 previously sequenced population controls across 73.5 million variants. We then imputed from these sequences into new and existing genome-wide association study cohorts and tested for association at ∼12 million variants in a total of 16,432 cases and 18,843 controls. We discovered a 0.6% frequency missense variant in ADCY7 that doubles the risk of ulcerative colitis. Despite good statistical power, we did not identify any other new low-frequency risk variants and found that such variants explained little heritability. We detected a burden of very rare, damaging missense variants in known Crohn's disease risk genes, suggesting that more comprehensive sequencing studies will continue to improve understanding of the biology of complex diseases.

de Lange KM, Moutsianas L, Lee JC, Lamb CA, Luo Y, Kennedy NA, Jostins L, Rice DL, Gutierrez-Achury J, Ji S-G et al. 2017. Genome-wide association study implicates immune activation of multiple integrin genes in inflammatory bowel disease. Nat Genet, 49 (2), pp. 256-261. | Show Abstract | Read more

Genetic association studies have identified 215 risk loci for inflammatory bowel disease, thereby uncovering fundamental aspects of its molecular biology. We performed a genome-wide association study of 25,305 individuals and conducted a meta-analysis with published summary statistics, yielding a total sample size of 59,957 subjects. We identified 25 new susceptibility loci, 3 of which contain integrin genes that encode proteins in pathways that have been identified as important therapeutic targets in inflammatory bowel disease. The associated variants are correlated with expression changes in response to immune stimulus at two of these genes (ITGA4 and ITGB8) and at previously implicated loci (ITGAL and ICAM1). In all four cases, the expression-increasing allele also increases disease risk. We also identified likely causal missense variants in a gene implicated in primary immune deficiency, PLCG2, and a negative regulator of inflammation, SLAMF8. Our results demonstrate that new associations at common variants continue to identify genes relevant to therapeutic target identification and prioritization.

Cahill TJ, Leo V, Kelly M, Stockenhuber A, Kennedy NW, Bao L, Cereghetti GM, Harper AR, Czibik G, Liao C et al. 2016. Resistance of dynamin-related protein 1 oligomers to disassembly impairs mitophagy, resulting in myocardial inflammation and heart failure. J Biol Chem, 291 (49), pp. 25762. | Show Abstract | Read more

© 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc. Chunyan Liao's and Grazia M. Cereghetti's names were misspelled. The names have been corrected as shown above.

Rivas MA, Graham D, Sulem P, Stevens C, Desch AN, Goyette P, Gudbjartsson D, Jonsdottir I, Thorsteinsdottir U, Degenhardt F et al. 2016. A protein-truncating R179X variant in RNF186 confers protection against ulcerative colitis. Nat Commun, 7 pp. 12342. | Show Abstract | Read more

Protein-truncating variants protective against human disease provide in vivo validation of therapeutic targets. Here we used targeted sequencing to conduct a search for protein-truncating variants conferring protection against inflammatory bowel disease exploiting knowledge of common variants associated with the same disease. Through replication genotyping and imputation we found that a predicted protein-truncating variant (rs36095412, p.R179X, genotyped in 11,148 ulcerative colitis patients and 295,446 controls, MAF=up to 0.78%) in RNF186, a single-exon ring finger E3 ligase with strong colonic expression, protects against ulcerative colitis (overall P=6.89 × 10(-7), odds ratio=0.30). We further demonstrate that the truncated protein exhibits reduced expression and altered subcellular localization, suggesting the protective mechanism may reside in the loss of an interaction or function via mislocalization and/or loss of an essential transmembrane domain.

Muraro D, Simmons A. 2016. An integrative analysis of gene expression and molecular interaction data to identify dys-regulated sub-networks in inflammatory bowel disease. BMC Bioinformatics, 17 (1), pp. 42. | Show Abstract | Read more

BACKGROUND: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) consists of two main disease-subtypes, Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC); these subtypes share overlapping genetic and clinical features. Genome-wide microarray data enable unbiased documentation of alterations in gene expression that may be disease-specific. As genetic diseases are believed to be caused by genetic alterations affecting the function of signalling pathways, module-centric optimisation algorithms, whose aim is to identify sub-networks that are dys-regulated in disease, are emerging as promising approaches. RESULTS: In order to account for the topological structure of molecular interaction networks, we developed an optimisation algorithm that integrates databases of known molecular interactions with gene expression data; such integration enables identification of differentially regulated network modules. We verified the performance of our algorithm by testing it on simulated networks; we then applied the same method to study experimental data derived from microarray analysis of CD and UC biopsies and human interactome databases. This analysis allowed the extraction of dys-regulated subnetworks under different experimental conditions (inflamed and uninflamed tissues in CD and UC). Optimisation was performed to highlight differentially expressed network modules that may be common or specific to the disease subtype. CONCLUSIONS: We show that the selected subnetworks include genes and pathways of known relevance for IBD; in particular, the solutions found highlight cross-talk among enriched pathways, mainly the JAK/STAT signalling pathway and the EGF receptor signalling pathway. In addition, integration of gene expression with molecular interaction data highlights nodes that, although not being differentially expressed, interact with differentially expressed nodes and are part of pathways that are relevant to IBD. The method proposed here may help identifying dys-regulated sub-networks that are common in different diseases and sub-networks whose dys-regulation is specific to a particular disease.

Pichulik T, Khatamzas E, Liu X, Brain O, Delmiro Garcia M, Leslie A, Danis B, Mayer A, Baban D, Ragoussis J et al. 2016. Pattern recognition receptor mediated downregulation of microRNA-650 fine-tunes MxA expression in dendritic cells infected with influenza A virus. Eur J Immunol, 46 (1), pp. 167-177. | Show Abstract | Read more

MicroRNAs are important posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression, which have been shown to fine-tune innate immune responses downstream of pattern recognition receptor (PRR) signaling. This study identifies miR-650 as a novel PRR-responsive microRNA that is downregulated upon stimulation of primary human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) with a variety of different microbe-associated molecular patterns. A comprehensive target search combining in silico analysis, transcriptional profiling, and reporter assays reveals that miR-650 regulates several well-known interferon-stimulated genes, including IFIT2 and MXA. In particular, downregulation of miR-650 in influenza A infected MDDCs enhances the expression of MxA and may therefore contribute to the establishment of an antiviral state. Together these findings reveal a novel link between miR-650 and the innate immune response in human MDDCs.

Cahill TJ, Leo V, Kelly M, Stockenhuber A, Kennedy NW, Bao L, Cereghetti GM, Harper AR, Czibik G, Liao C et al. 2015. Resistance of Dynamin-related Protein 1 Oligomers to Disassembly Impairs Mitophagy, Resulting in Myocardial Inflammation and Heart Failure. J Biol Chem, 290 (43), pp. 25907-25919. | Show Abstract | Read more

We have reported previously that a missense mutation in the mitochondrial fission gene Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) underlies the Python mouse model of monogenic dilated cardiomyopathy. The aim of this study was to investigate the consequences of the C452F mutation on Drp1 protein function and to define the cellular sequelae leading to heart failure in the Python monogenic dilated cardiomyopathy model. We found that the C452F mutation increased Drp1 GTPase activity. The mutation also conferred resistance to oligomer disassembly by guanine nucleotides and high ionic strength solutions. In a mouse embryonic fibroblast model, Drp1 C452F cells exhibited abnormal mitochondrial morphology and defective mitophagy. Mitochondria in C452F mouse embryonic fibroblasts were depolarized and had reduced calcium uptake with impaired ATP production by oxidative phosphorylation. In the Python heart, we found a corresponding progressive decline in oxidative phosphorylation with age and activation of sterile inflammation. As a corollary, enhancing autophagy by exposure to a prolonged low-protein diet improved cardiac function in Python mice. In conclusion, failure of Drp1 disassembly impairs mitophagy, leading to a downstream cascade of mitochondrial depolarization, aberrant calcium handling, impaired ATP synthesis, and activation of sterile myocardial inflammation, resulting in heart failure.

Liu JZ, van Sommeren S, Huang H, Ng SC, Alberts R, Takahashi A, Ripke S, Lee JC, Jostins L, Shah T et al. 2015. Association analyses identify 38 susceptibility loci for inflammatory bowel disease and highlight shared genetic risk across populations. Nat Genet, 47 (9), pp. 979-986. | Show Abstract | Read more

Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are the two main forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Here we report the first trans-ancestry association study of IBD, with genome-wide or Immunochip genotype data from an extended cohort of 86,640 European individuals and Immunochip data from 9,846 individuals of East Asian, Indian or Iranian descent. We implicate 38 loci in IBD risk for the first time. For the majority of the IBD risk loci, the direction and magnitude of effect are consistent in European and non-European cohorts. Nevertheless, we observe genetic heterogeneity between divergent populations at several established risk loci driven by differences in allele frequency (NOD2) or effect size (TNFSF15 and ATG16L1) or a combination of these factors (IL23R and IRGM). Our results provide biological insights into the pathogenesis of IBD and demonstrate the usefulness of trans-ancestry association studies for mapping loci associated with complex diseases and understanding genetic architecture across diverse populations.

Owens BMJ, Steevels TAM, Dudek M, Walcott D, Sun M-Y, Mayer A, Allan P, Simmons A. 2015. Corrigendum: CD90(+) Stromal Cells are Non-Professional Innate Immune Effectors of the Human Colonic Mucosa. Front Immunol, 6 (JUN), pp. 325. | Show Abstract | Read more

[This corrects the article on p. 307 in vol. 4, PMID: 24137162.].

Taylor JC, Martin HC, Lise S, Broxholme J, Cazier J-B, Rimmer A, Kanapin A, Lunter G, Fiddy S, Allan C et al. 2015. Factors influencing success of clinical genome sequencing across a broad spectrum of disorders. Nat Genet, 47 (7), pp. 717-726. | Show Abstract | Read more

To assess factors influencing the success of whole-genome sequencing for mainstream clinical diagnosis, we sequenced 217 individuals from 156 independent cases or families across a broad spectrum of disorders in whom previous screening had identified no pathogenic variants. We quantified the number of candidate variants identified using different strategies for variant calling, filtering, annotation and prioritization. We found that jointly calling variants across samples, filtering against both local and external databases, deploying multiple annotation tools and using familial transmission above biological plausibility contributed to accuracy. Overall, we identified disease-causing variants in 21% of cases, with the proportion increasing to 34% (23/68) for mendelian disorders and 57% (8/14) in family trios. We also discovered 32 potentially clinically actionable variants in 18 genes unrelated to the referral disorder, although only 4 were ultimately considered reportable. Our results demonstrate the value of genome sequencing for routine clinical diagnosis but also highlight many outstanding challenges.

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European Pubmed Central

Prescott NJ, Lehne B, Stone K, Lee JC, Taylor K, Knight J, Papouli E, Mirza MM, Simpson MA, Spain SL et al. 2015. Pooled sequencing of 531 genes in inflammatory bowel disease identifies an associated rare variant in BTNL2 and implicates other immune related genes. PLoS Genet, 11 (2), pp. e1004955. | Show Abstract | Read more

The contribution of rare coding sequence variants to genetic susceptibility in complex disorders is an important but unresolved question. Most studies thus far have investigated a limited number of genes from regions which contain common disease associated variants. Here we investigate this in inflammatory bowel disease by sequencing the exons and proximal promoters of 531 genes selected from both genome-wide association studies and pathway analysis in pooled DNA panels from 474 cases of Crohn's disease and 480 controls. 80 variants with evidence of association in the sequencing experiment or with potential functional significance were selected for follow up genotyping in 6,507 IBD cases and 3,064 population controls. The top 5 disease associated variants were genotyped in an extension panel of 3,662 IBD cases and 3,639 controls, and tested for association in a combined analysis of 10,147 IBD cases and 7,008 controls. A rare coding variant p.G454C in the BTNL2 gene within the major histocompatibility complex was significantly associated with increased risk for IBD (p = 9.65x10-10, OR = 2.3[95% CI = 1.75-3.04]), but was independent of the known common associated CD and UC variants at this locus. Rare (<1%) and low frequency (1-5%) variants in 3 additional genes showed suggestive association (p<0.005) with either an increased risk (ARIH2 c.338-6C>T) or decreased risk (IL12B p.V298F, and NICN p.H191R) of IBD. These results provide additional insights into the involvement of the inhibition of T cell activation in the development of both sub-phenotypes of inflammatory bowel disease. We suggest that although rare coding variants may make a modest overall contribution to complex disease susceptibility, they can inform our understanding of the molecular pathways that contribute to pathogenesis.

Goyette P, Boucher G, Mallon D, Ellinghaus E, Jostins L, Huang H, Ripke S, Gusareva ES, Annese V, Hauser SL et al. 2015. High-density mapping of the MHC identifies a shared role for HLA-DRB1*01:03 in inflammatory bowel diseases and heterozygous advantage in ulcerative colitis. Nat Genet, 47 (2), pp. 172-179. | Show Abstract | Read more

Genome-wide association studies of the related chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) known as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis have shown strong evidence of association to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). This region encodes a large number of immunological candidates, including the antigen-presenting classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules. Studies in IBD have indicated that multiple independent associations exist at HLA and non-HLA genes, but they have lacked the statistical power to define the architecture of association and causal alleles. To address this, we performed high-density SNP typing of the MHC in >32,000 individuals with IBD, implicating multiple HLA alleles, with a primary role for HLA-DRB1*01:03 in both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Noteworthy differences were observed between these diseases, including a predominant role for class II HLA variants and heterozygous advantage observed in ulcerative colitis, suggesting an important role of the adaptive immune response in the colonic environment in the pathogenesis of IBD.

Muraro D, Lauffenburger DA, Simmons A. 2014. Prioritisation and network analysis of Crohn's disease susceptibility genes. PLoS One, 9 (9), pp. e108624. | Show Abstract | Read more

Recent Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) have revealed numerous Crohn's disease susceptibility genes and a key challenge now is in understanding how risk polymorphisms in associated genes might contribute to development of this disease. For a gene to contribute to disease phenotype, its risk variant will likely adversely communicate with a variety of other gene products to result in dysregulation of common signaling pathways. A vital challenge is to elucidate pathways of potentially greatest influence on pathological behaviour, in a manner recognizing how multiple relevant genes may yield integrative effect. In this work we apply mathematical analysis of networks involving the list of recently described Crohn's susceptibility genes, to prioritise pathways in relation to their potential development of this disease. Prioritisation was performed by applying a text mining and a diffusion based method (GRAIL, GPEC). Prospective biological significance of the resulting prioritised list of proteins is highlighted by changes in their gene expression levels in Crohn's patients intestinal tissue in comparison with healthy donors.

Heap GA, Weedon MN, Bewshea CM, Singh A, Chen M, Satchwell JB, Vivian JP, So K, Dubois PC, Andrews JM et al. 2014. HLA-DQA1-HLA-DRB1 variants confer susceptibility to pancreatitis induced by thiopurine immunosuppressants. Nat Genet, 46 (10), pp. 1131-1134. | Show Abstract | Read more

Pancreatitis occurs in approximately 4% of patients treated with the thiopurines azathioprine or mercaptopurine. Its development is unpredictable and almost always leads to drug withdrawal. We identified patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who had developed pancreatitis within 3 months of starting these drugs from 168 sites around the world. After detailed case adjudication, we performed a genome-wide association study on 172 cases and 2,035 controls with IBD. We identified strong evidence of association within the class II HLA region, with the most significant association identified at rs2647087 (odds ratio 2.59, 95% confidence interval 2.07-3.26, P = 2 × 10(-16)). We replicated these findings in an independent set of 78 cases and 472 controls with IBD matched for drug exposure. Fine mapping of the HLA region identified association with the HLA-DQA1*02:01-HLA-DRB1*07:01 haplotype. Patients heterozygous at rs2647087 have a 9% risk of developing pancreatitis after administration of a thiopurine, whereas homozygotes have a 17% risk.

Colak E, Leslie A, Zausmer K, Khatamzas E, Kubarenko AV, Pichulik T, Klimosch SN, Mayer A, Siggs O, Hector A et al. 2014. RNA and imidazoquinolines are sensed by distinct TLR7/8 ectodomain sites resulting in functionally disparate signaling events. J Immunol, 192 (12), pp. 5963-5973. | Show Abstract | Read more

TLRs 7 and 8 are pattern recognition receptors controlling antiviral host defense or autoimmune diseases. Apart from foreign and host RNA, synthetic RNA oligoribonucleotides (ORN) or small molecules of the imidazoquinoline family activate TLR7 and 8 and are being developed as therapeutic agonists. The structure-function relationships for RNA ORN and imidazoquinoline sensing and consequent downstream signaling by human TLR7 and TLR8 are unknown. Proteome- and genome-wide analyses in primary human monocyte-derived dendritic cells here showed that TLR8 sensing of RNA ORN versus imidazoquinoline translates to ligand-specific differential phosphorylation and transcriptional events. In addition, TLR7 and 8 ectodomains were found to discriminate between RNA ORN and imidazoquinolines by overlapping and nonoverlapping recognition sites to which murine loss-of-function mutations and human naturally occurring hyporesponsive polymorphisms map. Our data suggest TLR7 and TLR8 can signal in two different "modes" depending on the class of ligand. Considering RNA ORN and imidazoquinolines have been regarded as functionally interchangeable, our study highlights important functional incongruities whose understanding will be important for developing TLR7 or 8 therapeutics with desirable effector and safety profiles for in vivo application.

Kennedy NA, Walker AW, Berry SH, Duncan SH, Farquarson FM, Louis P, Thomson JM, UK IBD Genetics Consortium, Satsangi J, Flint HJ et al. 2014. The impact of different DNA extraction kits and laboratories upon the assessment of human gut microbiota composition by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. PLoS One, 9 (2), pp. e88982. | Show Abstract | Read more

INTRODUCTION: Determining bacterial community structure in fecal samples through DNA sequencing is an important facet of intestinal health research. The impact of different commercially available DNA extraction kits upon bacterial community structures has received relatively little attention. The aim of this study was to analyze bacterial communities in volunteer and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patient fecal samples extracted using widely used DNA extraction kits in established gastrointestinal research laboratories. METHODS: Fecal samples from two healthy volunteers (H3 and H4) and two relapsing IBD patients (I1 and I2) were investigated. DNA extraction was undertaken using MoBio Powersoil and MP Biomedicals FastDNA SPIN Kit for Soil DNA extraction kits. PCR amplification for pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes was performed in both laboratories on all samples. Hierarchical clustering of sequencing data was done using the Yue and Clayton similarity coefficient. RESULTS: DNA extracted using the FastDNA kit and the MoBio kit gave median DNA concentrations of 475 (interquartile range 228-561) and 22 (IQR 9-36) ng/µL respectively (p<0.0001). Hierarchical clustering of sequence data by Yue and Clayton coefficient revealed four clusters. Samples from individuals H3 and I2 clustered by patient; however, samples from patient I1 extracted with the MoBio kit clustered with samples from patient H4 rather than the other I1 samples. Linear modelling on relative abundance of common bacterial families revealed significant differences between kits; samples extracted with MoBio Powersoil showed significantly increased Bacteroidaceae, Ruminococcaceae and Porphyromonadaceae, and lower Enterobacteriaceae, Lachnospiraceae, Clostridiaceae, and Erysipelotrichaceae (p<0.05). CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates significant differences in DNA yield and bacterial DNA composition when comparing DNA extracted from the same fecal sample with different extraction kits. This highlights the importance of ensuring that samples in a study are prepared with the same method, and the need for caution when cross-comparing studies that use different methods.

Owens BMJ, Steevels TAM, Dudek M, Walcott D, Sun M-Y, Mayer A, Allan P, Simmons A. 2013. CD90(+) Stromal Cells are Non-Professional Innate Immune Effectors of the Human Colonic Mucosa. Front Immunol, 4 (SEP), pp. 307. | Show Abstract | Read more

Immune responses at the intestinal mucosa must allow for host protection whilst simultaneously avoiding inappropriate inflammation. Although much work has focused on the innate immune functionality of hematopoietic immune cells, non-hematopoietic cell populations - including epithelial and stromal cells - are now recognized as playing a key role in innate defense at this site. In this study we examined the innate immune capacity of primary human intestinal stromal cells (iSCs). CD90(+) iSCs isolated from human colonic mucosa expressed a wide array of innate immune receptors and functionally responded to stimulation with bacterial ligands. iSCs also sensed infection with live Salmonella typhimurium, rapidly expressing IL-1 family cytokines via a RIPK2/p38MAPK-dependent signaling process. In addition to responding to innate immune triggers, primary iSCs exhibited a capacity for bacterial uptake, phagocytosis, and antigen processing, although to a lesser extent than professional APCs. Thus CD90(+) iSCs represent an abundant population of "non-professional" innate immune effector cells of the human colonic mucosa and likely play an important adjunctive role in host defense and immune regulation at this site.

Brain O, Owens BMJ, Pichulik T, Allan P, Khatamzas E, Leslie A, Steevels T, Sharma S, Mayer A, Catuneanu AM et al. 2013. The intracellular sensor NOD2 induces microRNA-29 expression in human dendritic cells to limit IL-23 release. Immunity, 39 (3), pp. 521-536. | Show Abstract | Read more

NOD2 is an intracellular sensor that contributes to immune defense and inflammation. Here we investigated whether NOD2 mediates its effects through control of microRNAs (miRNAs). miR-29 expression was upregulated in human dendritic cells (DCs) in response to NOD2 signals, and miR-29 regulated the expression of multiple immune mediators. In particular, miR-29 downregulated interleukin-23 (IL-23) by targeting IL-12p40 directly and IL-23p19 indirectly, likely via reduction of ATF2. DSS-induced colitis was worse in miR-29-deficient mice and was associated with elevated IL-23 and T helper 17 signature cytokines in the intestinal mucosa. Crohn's disease (CD) patient DCs expressing NOD2 polymorphisms failed to induce miR-29 upon pattern recognition receptor stimulation and showed enhanced release of IL-12p40 on exposure to adherent invasive E. coli. Therefore, we suggest that loss of miR-29-mediated immunoregulation in CD DCs might contribute to elevated IL-23 in this disease.

Lee JC, Espéli M, Anderson CA, Linterman MA, Pocock JM, Williams NJ, Roberts R, Viatte S, Fu B, Peshu N et al. 2013. Human SNP links differential outcomes in inflammatory and infectious disease to a FOXO3-regulated pathway. Cell, 155 (1), pp. 57-69. | Show Abstract | Read more

The clinical course and eventual outcome, or prognosis, of complex diseases varies enormously between affected individuals. This variability critically determines the impact a disease has on a patient's life but is very poorly understood. Here, we exploit existing genome-wide association study data to gain insight into the role of genetics in prognosis. We identify a noncoding polymorphism in FOXO3A (rs12212067: T > G) at which the minor (G) allele, despite not being associated with disease susceptibility, is associated with a milder course of Crohn's disease and rheumatoid arthritis and with increased risk of severe malaria. Minor allele carriage is shown to limit inflammatory responses in monocytes via a FOXO3-driven pathway, which through TGFβ1 reduces production of proinflammatory cytokines, including TNFα, and increases production of anti-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-10. Thus, we uncover a shared genetic contribution to prognosis in distinct diseases that operates via a FOXO3-driven pathway modulating inflammatory responses.

Owens BMJ, Simmons A. 2013. Intestinal stromal cells in mucosal immunity and homeostasis. Mucosal Immunol, 6 (2), pp. 224-234. | Show Abstract | Read more

A growing body of evidence suggests that non-hematopoietic stromal cells of the intestine have multiple roles in immune responses and inflammation at this mucosal site. Despite this, many still consider gut stromal cells as passive structural entities, with past research focused heavily on their roles in fibrosis, tumor progression, and wound healing, rather than their contributions to immune function. In this review, we discuss our current knowledge of stromal cells in intestinal immunity, highlighting the many immunological axes in which stromal cells have a functional role. We also consider emerging data that broaden the potential scope of their contribution to immunity in the gut and argue that these so-called "non-immune" cells are reclassified in light of their diverse contributions to intestinal innate immunity and the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis.

Klionsky DJ, Abdalla FC, Abeliovich H, Abraham RT, Acevedo-Arozena A, Adeli K, Agholme L, Agnello M, Agostinis P, Aguirre-Ghiso JA et al. 2012. Guidelines for the use and interpretation of assays for monitoring autophagy. Autophagy, 8 (4), pp. 445-544. | Show Abstract | Read more

In 2008 we published the first set of guidelines for standardizing research in autophagy. Since then, research on this topic has continued to accelerate, and many new scientists have entered the field. Our knowledge base and relevant new technologies have also been expanding. Accordingly, it is important to update these guidelines for monitoring autophagy in different organisms. Various reviews have described the range of assays that have been used for this purpose. Nevertheless, there continues to be confusion regarding acceptable methods to measure autophagy, especially in multicellular eukaryotes. A key point that needs to be emphasized is that there is a difference between measurements that monitor the numbers or volume of autophagic elements (e.g., autophagosomes or autolysosomes) at any stage of the autophagic process vs. those that measure flux through the autophagy pathway (i.e., the complete process); thus, a block in macroautophagy that results in autophagosome accumulation needs to be differentiated from stimuli that result in increased autophagic activity, defined as increased autophagy induction coupled with increased delivery to, and degradation within, lysosomes (in most higher eukaryotes and some protists such as Dictyostelium) or the vacuole (in plants and fungi). In other words, it is especially important that investigators new to the field understand that the appearance of more autophagosomes does not necessarily equate with more autophagy. In fact, in many cases, autophagosomes accumulate because of a block in trafficking to lysosomes without a concomitant change in autophagosome biogenesis, whereas an increase in autolysosomes may reflect a reduction in degradative activity. Here, we present a set of guidelines for the selection and interpretation of methods for use by investigators who aim to examine macroautophagy and related processes, as well as for reviewers who need to provide realistic and reasonable critiques of papers that are focused on these processes. These guidelines are not meant to be a formulaic set of rules, because the appropriate assays depend in part on the question being asked and the system being used. In addition, we emphasize that no individual assay is guaranteed to be the most appropriate one in every situation, and we strongly recommend the use of multiple assays to monitor autophagy. In these guidelines, we consider these various methods of assessing autophagy and what information can, or cannot, be obtained from them. Finally, by discussing the merits and limits of particular autophagy assays, we hope to encourage technical innovation in the field.

Simmons A. 2011. NOD2 function in Crohn's disease. J Transl Med, 9 Suppl 2 (Suppl 2), pp. I10. | Read more

Brain O, Cooney R, Simmons A, Jewell D. 2012. Functional consequences of mutations in the autophagy genes in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease. Inflamm Bowel Dis, 18 (4), pp. 778-781. | Show Abstract | Read more

Genome-wide association studies have highlighted a number of genes involved in autophagy, which are of potential importance in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD). The associated polymorphisms in ATG16L1 and IRGM have been confirmed, and functional studies have begun to shed light on how they link to CD pathogenesis. In this review we consider the most salient aspects of this rapidly expanding field.

Ranasinghe SRF, Kramer HB, Wright C, Kessler BM, di Gleria K, Zhang Y, Gillespie GM, Blais M-E, Culshaw A, Pichulik T et al. 2011. The Antiviral Efficacy of HIV-Specific CD8(+) T-Cells to a Conserved Epitope Is Heavily Dependent on the Infecting HIV-1 Isolate PLOS PATHOGENS, 7 (5), | Show Abstract | Read more

A major challenge to developing a successful HIV vaccine is the vast diversity of viral sequences, yet it is generally assumed that an epitope conserved between different strains will be recognised by responding T-cells. We examined whether an invariant HLA-B8 restricted Nef90-97epitope FL8 shared between five high titre viruses and eight recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing Nef from different viral isolates (clades A-H) could activate antiviral activity in FL8-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL). Surprisingly, despite epitope conservation, we found that CTL antiviral efficacy is dependent on the infecting viral isolate. Only 23% of Nef proteins, expressed by HIV-1 isolates or as recombinant vaccinia-Nef, were optimally recognised by CTL. Recognition of the HIV-1 isolates by CTL was independent of clade-grouping but correlated with virus-specific polymorphisms in the epitope flanking region, which altered immunoproteasomal cleavage resulting in enhanced or impaired epitope generation. The finding that the majority of virus isolates failed to present this conserved epitope highlights the importance of viral variance in CTL epitope flanking regions on the efficiency of antigen processing, which has been considerably underestimated previously. This has important implications for future vaccine design strategies since efficient presentation of conserved viral epitopes is necessary to promote enhanced anti-viral immune responses. © 2011 Ranasinghe et al.

Simmons A. 2010. Crohn's disease: Genes, viruses and microbes. Nature, 466 (7307), pp. 699-700. | Show Abstract | Read more

Variations in several genes can increase an individual's susceptibility to complex disorders. But what tips the balance to cause the full-blown disease? For Crohn's disease, viruses could provide part of the answer. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

Brain O, Allan P, Simmons A. 2010. NOD2-mediated autophagy and Crohn disease. Autophagy, 6 (3), pp. 412-414. | Show Abstract | Read more

Autophagy is important in immune cells as a means of disposing of pathogens and in connecting with the antigen presentation machinery to facilitate immune priming and initiation of a correctly targeted adaptive immune response. While Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are known to regulate autophagy in this context, the extent to which other pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are involved has been unclear. NOD2 is an intracellular PRR of the Nod-like receptor (NLR) family that is notable in that variants in the ligand recognition domain are associated with Crohn disease (CD). Our recent study shows NOD2 activates autophagy in a manner requiring ATG16L1, another CD susceptibility gene. NOD2 autophagy induction is required for bacterial handling and MHC class II antigen presentation in human dendritic cells (DCs). CD patients DCs expressing CD risk variant NOD2 or ATG16L1 display reduced autophagy induction after NOD2 triggering resulting in reduced bacterial killing and defective antigen presentation. Aberrant bacterial handling and immune priming could act as a trigger for inflammation in CD.

Cooney R, Baker J, Brain O, Danis B, Pichulik T, Allan P, Ferguson DJP, Campbell BJ, Jewell D, Simmons A. 2010. NOD2 stimulation induces autophagy in dendritic cells influencing bacterial handling and antigen presentation. Nat Med, 16 (1), pp. 90-97. | Show Abstract | Read more

Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing-2 (NOD2) acts as a bacterial sensor in dendritic cells (DCs), but it is not clear how bacterial recognition links with antigen presentation after NOD2 stimulation. NOD2 variants are associated with Crohn's disease, where breakdown in self-recognition of commensal bacteria leads to gastrointestinal inflammation. Here we show NOD2 triggering by muramyldipeptide induces autophagy in DCs. This effect requires receptor-interacting serine-threonine kinase-2 (RIPK-2), autophagy-related protein-5 (ATG5), ATG7 and ATG16L1 but not NLR family, pyrin domain containing-3 (NALP3).We show that NOD2-mediated autophagy is required for both bacterial handling and generation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen-specific CD4(+) T cell responses in DCs. DCs from individuals with Crohn's disease expressing Crohn's disease-associated NOD2 or ATG16L1 risk variants are defective in autophagy induction, bacterial trafficking and antigen presentation. Our findings link two Crohn's disease-associated susceptibility genes in a single functional pathway and reveal defects in this pathway in Crohn's disease DCs that could lead to bacterial persistence via impaired lysosomal destruction and immune mediated clearance.

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Scopus

Kramer HB, Lavender KJ, Qin L, Stacey AR, Liu MKP, di Gleria K, Simmons A, Gasper-Smith N, Haynes BF, McMichael AJ et al. 2010. Elevation of intact and proteolytic fragments of acute phase proteins constitutes the earliest systemic antiviral response in HIV-1 infection PLoS Pathogens, 6 (5), pp. 1-12. | Show Abstract | Read more

The earliest immune responses activated in acute human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection (AHI) exert a critical influence on subsequent virus spread or containment. During this time frame, components of the innate immune system such as macrophages and DCs, NK cells, b-defensins, complement and other anti-microbial factors, which have all been implicated in modulating HIV infection, may play particularly important roles. A proteomics-based screen was performed on a cohort from whom samples were available at time points prior to the earliest positive HIV detection. The ability of selected factors found to be elevated in the plasma during AHI to inhibit HIV-1 replication was analyzed using in vitro PBMC and DC infection models. Analysis of unique plasma donor panels spanning the eclipse and viral expansion phases revealed very early alterations in plasma proteins in AHI. Induction of acute phase protein serum amyloid A (A-SAA) occurred as early as 5-7 days prior to the first detection of plasma viral RNA, considerably prior to any elevation in systemic cytokine levels. Furthermore, a proteolytic fragment of alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), termed virus inhibitory peptide (VIRIP), was observed in plasma coincident with viremia. Both A-SAA and VIRIP have anti-viral activity in vitro and quantitation of their plasma levels indicated that circulating concentrations are likely to be within the range of their inhibitory activity. Our results provide evidence for a first wave of host anti-viral defense occurring in the eclipse phase of AHI prior to systemic activation of other immune responses. Insights gained into the mechanism of action of acute-phase reactants and other innate molecules against HIV and how they are induced could be exploited for the future development of more efficient prophylactic vaccine strategies. © 2010 Kramer et al.

Kramer HB, Lavender KJ, Qin L, Stacey AR, Liu MKP, di Gleria K, Simmons A, Gasper-Smith N, Haynes BF, McMichael AJ et al. 2010. Elevation of intact and proteolytic fragments of acute phase proteins constitutes the earliest systemic antiviral response in HIV-1 infection. PLoS Pathog, 6 (5), pp. e1000893. | Show Abstract | Read more

The earliest immune responses activated in acute human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection (AHI) exert a critical influence on subsequent virus spread or containment. During this time frame, components of the innate immune system such as macrophages and DCs, NK cells, beta-defensins, complement and other anti-microbial factors, which have all been implicated in modulating HIV infection, may play particularly important roles. A proteomics-based screen was performed on a cohort from whom samples were available at time points prior to the earliest positive HIV detection. The ability of selected factors found to be elevated in the plasma during AHI to inhibit HIV-1 replication was analyzed using in vitro PBMC and DC infection models. Analysis of unique plasma donor panels spanning the eclipse and viral expansion phases revealed very early alterations in plasma proteins in AHI. Induction of acute phase protein serum amyloid A (A-SAA) occurred as early as 5-7 days prior to the first detection of plasma viral RNA, considerably prior to any elevation in systemic cytokine levels. Furthermore, a proteolytic fragment of alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), termed virus inhibitory peptide (VIRIP), was observed in plasma coincident with viremia. Both A-SAA and VIRIP have anti-viral activity in vitro and quantitation of their plasma levels indicated that circulating concentrations are likely to be within the range of their inhibitory activity. Our results provide evidence for a first wave of host anti-viral defense occurring in the eclipse phase of AHI prior to systemic activation of other immune responses. Insights gained into the mechanism of action of acute-phase reactants and other innate molecules against HIV and how they are induced could be exploited for the future development of more efficient prophylactic vaccine strategies.

Ranasinghe SRF, Kramer HB, Wright C, Kessler BM, di Gleria K, Zhang Y, Gillespie GM, Blais M-E, Culshaw A, Pichulik T et al. 2011. The antiviral efficacy of HIV-specific CD8⁺ T-cells to a conserved epitope is heavily dependent on the infecting HIV-1 isolate. PLoS Pathog, 7 (5), pp. e1001341. | Show Abstract | Read more

A major challenge to developing a successful HIV vaccine is the vast diversity of viral sequences, yet it is generally assumed that an epitope conserved between different strains will be recognised by responding T-cells. We examined whether an invariant HLA-B8 restricted Nef₉₀₋₉₇ epitope FL8 shared between five high titre viruses and eight recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing Nef from different viral isolates (clades A-H) could activate antiviral activity in FL8-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL). Surprisingly, despite epitope conservation, we found that CTL antiviral efficacy is dependent on the infecting viral isolate. Only 23% of Nef proteins, expressed by HIV-1 isolates or as recombinant vaccinia-Nef, were optimally recognised by CTL. Recognition of the HIV-1 isolates by CTL was independent of clade-grouping but correlated with virus-specific polymorphisms in the epitope flanking region, which altered immunoproteasomal cleavage resulting in enhanced or impaired epitope generation. The finding that the majority of virus isolates failed to present this conserved epitope highlights the importance of viral variance in CTL epitope flanking regions on the efficiency of antigen processing, which has been considerably underestimated previously. This has important implications for future vaccine design strategies since efficient presentation of conserved viral epitopes is necessary to promote enhanced anti-viral immune responses.

Hodges A, Sharrocks K, Edelmann M, Baban D, Moris A, Schwartz O, Drakesmith H, Davies K, Kessler B, McMichael A, Simmons A. 2007. Activation of the lectin DC-SIGN induces an immature dendritic cell phenotype triggering Rho-GTPase activity required for HIV-1 replication. Nat Immunol, 8 (6), pp. 569-577. | Show Abstract | Read more

DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin expressed on dendritic cells (DCs), can sequester human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) virions in multivesicular bodies. Here, using large-scale gene expression profiling and tyrosine-phosphorylated proteome analyses, we characterized signaling mediated by DC-SIGN after activation by either HIV or a DC-SIGN-specific antibody. Activation of DC-SIGN resulted in downregulation of genes encoding major histocompatibility complex class II, Jagged 1 and interferon-response molecules and upregulation of the gene encoding transcription factor ATF3. Phosphorylated proteome analysis showed that HIV- or antibody-stimulated DC-SIGN signaling was mediated by the Rho guanine nucleotide-exchange factor LARG and led to increased Rho-GTPase activity. Activation of LARG in DCs exposed to HIV was required for the formation of virus-T cell synapses. Thus, HIV sequestration by and stimulation of DC-SIGN helps HIV evade immune responses and spread to cells.

Cebere I, Dorrell L, McShane H, Simmons A, McCormack S, Schmidt C, Smith C, Brooks M, Roberts JE, Darwin SC et al. 2006. Phase I clinical trial safety of DNA- and modified virus Ankara-vectored human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccines administered alone and in a prime-boost regime to healthy HIV-1-uninfected volunteers. Vaccine, 24 (4), pp. 417-425. | Show Abstract | Read more

DNA- and modified virus Ankara (MVA)-vectored candidate vaccines expressing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) clade A-derived p24/p17 gag fused to a string of HLA class I epitopes, called HIVA, were tested in phase I trials in healthy, HIV-1/2-uninfected adults in Oxford, United Kingdom. Eighteen volunteers were vaccinated with pTHr.HIVA DNA (IAVI-001) alone, 8 volunteers received MVA.HIVA (IAVI-003) alone and 9 volunteers from study IAVI-001 were boosted with MVA.HIVA 9-14 months after DNA priming (IAVI-005). Immunogenicity results observed in these trials was published previously [Mwau M, Cebere I, Sutton J, Chikoti P, Winstone N, Wee EG-T, et al. An HIV-1 clade A vaccine in clinical trials: stimulation of HIV-specific T cell responses by DNA and recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) vaccines in humans. J Gen Virol 2004;85:911-9]. Here, we report on the safety of the two vaccines and the vaccine regimes. Overall, both candidate vaccines were safe and well tolerated. There were no reported vaccine-related adverse events over the 6-month period of the study and up to 2 years after the last vaccination. There were no moderate or severe local symptoms recorded after the pTHr.HIVA DNA intramuscular administration. Almost all participants experienced local reactogenicity events such as redness and induration after MVA.HIVA intradermal injection. Thus, the results from these initial small phase I trials administering the pTHr.HIVA DNA and MVA.HIVA vaccines either alone or in a prime-boost regime to healthy HIV-1/2-negative adults indicated that the vaccines were safe and warranted further testing of this approach in larger phase I/II studies.

Cited:

101

Scopus

Cebere I, Dorrell L, McShane H, Simmons A, McCormack S, Schmidt C, Smith C, Brooks M, Roberts JE, Darwin SC et al. 2006. Phase I clinical trial safety of DNA- and modified virus Ankara-vectored human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccines administered alone and in a prime-boost regime to healthy HIV-1-uninfected volunteers Vaccine, 24 (4), pp. 417-425. | Show Abstract | Read more

DNA- and modified virus Ankara (MVA)-vectored candidate vaccines expressing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) clade A-derived p24/p17 gag fused to a string of HLA class I epitopes, called HIVA, were tested in phase I trials in healthy, HIV-1/2-uninfected adults in Oxford, United Kingdom. Eighteen volunteers were vaccinated with pTHr.HIVA DNA (IAVI-001) alone, 8 volunteers received MVA.HIVA (IAVI-003) alone and 9 volunteers from study IAVI-001 were boosted with MVA.HIVA 9-14 months after DNA priming (IAVI-005). Immunogenicity results observed in these trials was published previously [Mwau M, Cebere I, Sutton J, Chikoti P, Winstone N, Wee EG-T, et al. An HIV-1 clade A vaccine in clinical trials: stimulation of HIV-specific T cell responses by DNA and recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) vaccines in humans. J Gen Virol 2004;85:911-9]. Here, we report on the safety of the two vaccines and the vaccine regimes. Overall, both candidate vaccines were safe and well tolerated. There were no reported vaccine-related adverse events over the 6-month period of the study and up to 2 years after the last vaccination. There were no moderate or severe local symptoms recorded after the pTHr.HIVA DNA intramuscular administration. Almost all participants experienced local reactogenicity events such as redness and induration after MVA.HIVA intradermal injection. Thus, the results from these initial small phase I trials administering the pTHr.HIVA DNA and MVA.HIVA vaccines either alone or in a prime-boost regime to healthy HIV-1/2-negative adults indicated that the vaccines were safe and warranted further testing of this approach in larger phase I/II studies. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Simmons A, Gangadharan B, Hodges A, Sharrocks K, Prabhakar S, García A, Dwek R, Zitzmann N, McMichael A. 2005. Nef-mediated lipid raft exclusion of UbcH7 inhibits Cbl activity in T cells to positively regulate signaling. Immunity, 23 (6), pp. 621-634. | Show Abstract | Read more

Lentiviral Nef increases T cell signaling activity, but the molecular nature of the stimulus involved is incompletely described. We explored CD4 T cell lipid raft composition in the presence and absence of Nef. Here, the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UbcH7, which acts in conjunction with c-Cbl, is absent from lipid rafts. This Nef-mediated exclusion is associated with failure of ubiquitination of activated Vav. In the presence of Nef, lipid raft Cdc42 is activated and forms a ternary complex between the c-Cbl-interacting protein p85Cool-1/betaPix and c-Cbl, displacing UbcH7 from rafts. Suppression of p85Cool-1/betaPix expression restores UbcH7 raft localization and Vav ubiquitination and diminishes Cdc42 activity. Moreover, p85Cool-1/betaPix knockdown attenuates HIV replication. Thresholds for activation of signaling involve the intricate balance of positive and negative regulators. Here we provide evidence for Nef disruption of a negative regulator of T cell signaling in promoting HIV replication.

Simmons A, Aluvihare V, McMichael A. 2001. Nef triggers a transcriptional program in T cells imitating single-signal T cell activation and inducing HIV virulence mediators. Immunity, 14 (6), pp. 763-777. | Show Abstract | Read more

Gene expression profiling was used to explore the role of Nef in HIV. Nef induces a transcriptional program in T cells that is 97% identical to that of anti-CD3 T cell activation. This program is inhibited in the presence of cyclosporin. A requirement for TCR zeta and ZAP-70 is demonstrated for formation of the complete profile. Among eight factors particular to the anti-CD3 activation profile are IL16 and YY1, negative regulators of HIV transcription. In contrast, Nef exclusively upregulates factors positively regulating HIV, including Tat-SF1, U1 SNRNP, and IRF-2. New genes associated with Nef include CDK9, the induction of which enhances Tat function. Thus, Nef acts as a master switch early in the viral life cycle, forcing an environment conducive to dynamic viral production.

Ambrose T, Simmons A. 2018. Cannabis, cannabinoids and the endocannabinoid system - is there therapeutic potential for inflammatory bowel disease? J Crohns Colitis, | Show Abstract | Read more

Cannabis sativa and its extracts have been used for centuries both medicinally and recreationally. There is accumulating evidence that exogenous cannabis and related cannabinoids improve symptoms associated with inflammatory bowel disease such as pain, loss of appetite, and diarrhoea. In vivo, exocannabinoids have been demonstrated to improve colitis, mainly in chemical models.Exocannabinoids signal through the endocannabinoid system, an increasingly understood network of endogenous lipid ligands and their receptors, together with a number of synthetic and degradative enzymes and the resulting products. Modulating the endocannabinoid system using pharmacological receptor agonists, genetic knockout models, or inhibition of degradative enzymes have largely shown improvements in colitis in vivo. Despite these promising experimental results, this has not translated into meaningful benefits for human IBD in the few clinical trials which have been conducted to date. The largest study to date being limited by poor medication tolerance due to the Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol component.This review article synthesises the current literature surrounding the modulation of the endocannabinoid system and administration of exocannabinoids in experimental and human IBD. Findings of clinical surveys and studies of cannabis use in IBD are summarised. Discrepancies in the literature are highlighted together with identifying novel areas of interest.

Kinchen J, Chen HH, Parikh K, Antanaviciute A, Jagielowicz M, Fawkner-Corbett D, Ashley N, Cubitt L, Mellado-Gomez E, Attar M et al. 2018. Structural Remodeling of the Human Colonic Mesenchyme in Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Cell, 175 (2), pp. 372-386.e17. | Show Abstract | Read more

Intestinal mesenchymal cells play essential roles in epithelial homeostasis, matrix remodeling, immunity, and inflammation. But the extent of heterogeneity within the colonic mesenchyme in these processes remains unknown. Using unbiased single-cell profiling of over 16,500 colonic mesenchymal cells, we reveal four subsets of fibroblasts expressing divergent transcriptional regulators and functional pathways, in addition to pericytes and myofibroblasts. We identified a niche population located in proximity to epithelial crypts expressing SOX6, F3 (CD142), and WNT genes essential for colonic epithelial stem cell function. In colitis, we observed dysregulation of this niche and emergence of an activated mesenchymal population. This subset expressed TNF superfamily member 14 (TNFSF14), fibroblastic reticular cell-associated genes, IL-33, and Lysyl oxidases. Further, it induced factors that impaired epithelial proliferation and maturation and contributed to oxidative stress and disease severity in vivo. Our work defines how the colonic mesenchyme remodels to fuel inflammation and barrier dysfunction in IBD.

Khatamzas E, Hipp MM, Gaughan D, Pichulik T, Leslie A, Fernandes RA, Muraro D, Booth S, Zausmer K, Sun M-Y et al. 2017. Snapin promotes HIV-1 transmission from dendritic cells by dampening TLR8 signaling. EMBO J, 36 (20), pp. 2998-3011. | Show Abstract | Read more

HIV-1 traffics through dendritic cells (DCs) en route to establishing a productive infection in T lymphocytes but fails to induce an innate immune response. Within DC endosomes, HIV-1 somehow evades detection by the pattern-recognition receptor (PRR) Toll-like receptor 8 (TLR8). Using a phosphoproteomic approach, we identified a robust and diverse signaling cascade triggered by HIV-1 upon entry into human DCs. A secondary siRNA screen of the identified signaling factors revealed several new mediators of HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4+ T cells in DCs, including the dynein motor protein Snapin. Inhibition of Snapin enhanced localization of HIV-1 with TLR8+ early endosomes, triggered a pro-inflammatory response, and inhibited trans-infection of CD4+ T cells. Snapin inhibited TLR8 signaling in the absence of HIV-1 and is a general regulator of endosomal maturation. Thus, we identify a new mechanism of innate immune sensing by TLR8 in DCs, which is exploited by HIV-1 to promote transmission.

Brain O, Owens BMJ, Pichulik T, Allan P, Khatamzas E, Leslie A, Steevels T, Sharma S, Mayer A, Catuneanu AM et al. 2013. The intracellular sensor NOD2 induces microRNA-29 expression in human dendritic cells to limit IL-23 release. Immunity, 39 (3), pp. 521-536. | Show Abstract | Read more

NOD2 is an intracellular sensor that contributes to immune defense and inflammation. Here we investigated whether NOD2 mediates its effects through control of microRNAs (miRNAs). miR-29 expression was upregulated in human dendritic cells (DCs) in response to NOD2 signals, and miR-29 regulated the expression of multiple immune mediators. In particular, miR-29 downregulated interleukin-23 (IL-23) by targeting IL-12p40 directly and IL-23p19 indirectly, likely via reduction of ATF2. DSS-induced colitis was worse in miR-29-deficient mice and was associated with elevated IL-23 and T helper 17 signature cytokines in the intestinal mucosa. Crohn's disease (CD) patient DCs expressing NOD2 polymorphisms failed to induce miR-29 upon pattern recognition receptor stimulation and showed enhanced release of IL-12p40 on exposure to adherent invasive E. coli. Therefore, we suggest that loss of miR-29-mediated immunoregulation in CD DCs might contribute to elevated IL-23 in this disease.

Cooney R, Baker J, Brain O, Danis B, Pichulik T, Allan P, Ferguson DJP, Campbell BJ, Jewell D, Simmons A. 2010. NOD2 stimulation induces autophagy in dendritic cells influencing bacterial handling and antigen presentation. Nat Med, 16 (1), pp. 90-97. | Show Abstract | Read more

Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing-2 (NOD2) acts as a bacterial sensor in dendritic cells (DCs), but it is not clear how bacterial recognition links with antigen presentation after NOD2 stimulation. NOD2 variants are associated with Crohn's disease, where breakdown in self-recognition of commensal bacteria leads to gastrointestinal inflammation. Here we show NOD2 triggering by muramyldipeptide induces autophagy in DCs. This effect requires receptor-interacting serine-threonine kinase-2 (RIPK-2), autophagy-related protein-5 (ATG5), ATG7 and ATG16L1 but not NLR family, pyrin domain containing-3 (NALP3).We show that NOD2-mediated autophagy is required for both bacterial handling and generation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen-specific CD4(+) T cell responses in DCs. DCs from individuals with Crohn's disease expressing Crohn's disease-associated NOD2 or ATG16L1 risk variants are defective in autophagy induction, bacterial trafficking and antigen presentation. Our findings link two Crohn's disease-associated susceptibility genes in a single functional pathway and reveal defects in this pathway in Crohn's disease DCs that could lead to bacterial persistence via impaired lysosomal destruction and immune mediated clearance.

Hodges A, Sharrocks K, Edelmann M, Baban D, Moris A, Schwartz O, Drakesmith H, Davies K, Kessler B, McMichael A, Simmons A. 2007. Activation of the lectin DC-SIGN induces an immature dendritic cell phenotype triggering Rho-GTPase activity required for HIV-1 replication. Nat Immunol, 8 (6), pp. 569-577. | Show Abstract | Read more

DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin expressed on dendritic cells (DCs), can sequester human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) virions in multivesicular bodies. Here, using large-scale gene expression profiling and tyrosine-phosphorylated proteome analyses, we characterized signaling mediated by DC-SIGN after activation by either HIV or a DC-SIGN-specific antibody. Activation of DC-SIGN resulted in downregulation of genes encoding major histocompatibility complex class II, Jagged 1 and interferon-response molecules and upregulation of the gene encoding transcription factor ATF3. Phosphorylated proteome analysis showed that HIV- or antibody-stimulated DC-SIGN signaling was mediated by the Rho guanine nucleotide-exchange factor LARG and led to increased Rho-GTPase activity. Activation of LARG in DCs exposed to HIV was required for the formation of virus-T cell synapses. Thus, HIV sequestration by and stimulation of DC-SIGN helps HIV evade immune responses and spread to cells.

Simmons A, Gangadharan B, Hodges A, Sharrocks K, Prabhakar S, García A, Dwek R, Zitzmann N, McMichael A. 2005. Nef-mediated lipid raft exclusion of UbcH7 inhibits Cbl activity in T cells to positively regulate signaling. Immunity, 23 (6), pp. 621-634. | Show Abstract | Read more

Lentiviral Nef increases T cell signaling activity, but the molecular nature of the stimulus involved is incompletely described. We explored CD4 T cell lipid raft composition in the presence and absence of Nef. Here, the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UbcH7, which acts in conjunction with c-Cbl, is absent from lipid rafts. This Nef-mediated exclusion is associated with failure of ubiquitination of activated Vav. In the presence of Nef, lipid raft Cdc42 is activated and forms a ternary complex between the c-Cbl-interacting protein p85Cool-1/betaPix and c-Cbl, displacing UbcH7 from rafts. Suppression of p85Cool-1/betaPix expression restores UbcH7 raft localization and Vav ubiquitination and diminishes Cdc42 activity. Moreover, p85Cool-1/betaPix knockdown attenuates HIV replication. Thresholds for activation of signaling involve the intricate balance of positive and negative regulators. Here we provide evidence for Nef disruption of a negative regulator of T cell signaling in promoting HIV replication.

Simmons A, Aluvihare V, McMichael A. 2001. Nef triggers a transcriptional program in T cells imitating single-signal T cell activation and inducing HIV virulence mediators. Immunity, 14 (6), pp. 763-777. | Show Abstract | Read more

Gene expression profiling was used to explore the role of Nef in HIV. Nef induces a transcriptional program in T cells that is 97% identical to that of anti-CD3 T cell activation. This program is inhibited in the presence of cyclosporin. A requirement for TCR zeta and ZAP-70 is demonstrated for formation of the complete profile. Among eight factors particular to the anti-CD3 activation profile are IL16 and YY1, negative regulators of HIV transcription. In contrast, Nef exclusively upregulates factors positively regulating HIV, including Tat-SF1, U1 SNRNP, and IRF-2. New genes associated with Nef include CDK9, the induction of which enhances Tat function. Thus, Nef acts as a master switch early in the viral life cycle, forcing an environment conducive to dynamic viral production.

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