Seminars

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Wed 22 Nov 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Please arrive 5 minutes early for access to the building, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

Towards a real-time genomic surveillance of arboviruses in the Americas

Nuno Faria

My research focuses on investigating the patterns of gene flow in pathogen populations. I am particularly interested in phylogenetic methods of sequence analysis that combine genetic, spatial and ecological information. Specific questions involve (i) uncovering the spatiotemporal dynamics of human... Read more

My research focuses on investigating the patterns of gene flow in pathogen populations. I am particularly interested in phylogenetic methods of sequence analysis that combine genetic, spatial and ecological information. Specific questions involve (i) uncovering the spatiotemporal dynamics of human and animal pathogens, (ii) identifying factors underlying pathogen spread and dynamics at different scales (e.g. geographic regions, body compartments) and (iii) investigating the drivers of cross-species transmission and host shifts.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Prof Lynn Dustin

Wed 22 Nov 2017 from 15:00 to 16:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences Seminar Series

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Behavioural drivers of obesity in Malaysia

Geeta Appannah

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 22 Nov 2017 from 16:00 to 17:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar rooms, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

BDI Inaugural Lecture: The Nature of Nurture

Augustine Kong

Using logical reasoning, mathematical modelling, and empirical data, we demonstrate that there is a genetic component to nurture. Recognising this effect will not only affect how we think about the question of Nature versus Nurture, there are implications for many areas of quantitative genetics.... Read more

Using logical reasoning, mathematical modelling, and empirical data, we demonstrate that there is a genetic component to nurture. Recognising this effect will not only affect how we think about the question of Nature versus Nurture, there are implications for many areas of quantitative genetics. Topics touched on Include the interpretation of GWAS results, parent-of-origin effects, pleiotropy, nurture from siblings, heritability, and selection and evolution.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Thu 23 Nov 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI, Basement meeting room, NDM Research Building, Headington OX3 7FZ

Targeting cancer therapy using oncolytic viruses

Prof Len Seymour

Oncolytic adenoviruses replicate and amplify themselves within tumour cells, mediating targeted cytotoxicity as well as allowing tumour-selective expression of encoded biologics such as cytokines or checkpoint inhibitor antibodies, for secretion into the tumour microenvironment. We have developed... Read more

Oncolytic adenoviruses replicate and amplify themselves within tumour cells, mediating targeted cytotoxicity as well as allowing tumour-selective expression of encoded biologics such as cytokines or checkpoint inhibitor antibodies, for secretion into the tumour microenvironment. We have developed adenoviruses suitable for i.v. delivery to disseminated disease in humans, and are now ‘arming’ them to express bispecific T cell engagers (BiTEs) capable of activating endogenous T cells to attack endogenous tumour cells. This new generation of viruses can combine targeted cytotoxicity, local reversal of immune suppression and intratumoural activation of T cells to give a combined therapeutic effect that can be rapidly translated into the clinic.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 23 Nov 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Medical Director's Office / Radiology

Dr Katie Jeffery, Dr Tony Berendt, Prof Fergus Gleeson

Medical Director's Office: "Rx: a Large Dose of Humble Pie", Dr Tony Berendt and Dr Katie Jeffery -- Radiology: "Quality control in Medicine/Radiology. Why don’t we measure it?", Prof Fergus Gleeson -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Medical Director's Office: "Rx: a Large Dose of Humble Pie", Dr Tony Berendt and Dr Katie Jeffery -- Radiology: "Quality control in Medicine/Radiology. Why don’t we measure it?", Prof Fergus Gleeson -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Fri 24 Nov 2017 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

How to ask the right questions

Professor Wytske Fokkens

'How to ask the right questions' will be a talk about the journey of learning to do research and asking yourself the right questions. Wytske J. Fokkens is Professor at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology at the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam. Her main field of interest is sinus/skullbase... Read more

'How to ask the right questions' will be a talk about the journey of learning to do research and asking yourself the right questions. Wytske J. Fokkens is Professor at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology at the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam. Her main field of interest is sinus/skullbase surgery and mucosal pathology of the upper and lower airways. She is the secretary general of the ERS. She is the Chairman of the European Position Paper on Rhinosinusitis and Nasal Polyps (EPOS). Dr. Fokkens is a member of the executive committee of ARIA, and workpackage and center leader of GA2LEN, the EU network of excellence. She is the author of more than 350 papers on rhinology and allergy that have been published in peer-reviewed journals. She has written a textbook on Rhinology: Rhinology and Skull Base Surgery, From the Lab to the Operating Room – An Evidence Based Approach, (Thieme ). Since 15 years she organizes an advanced sinus surgery course. She serves as Editor in chief of Rhinology and Associate Editor of Allergy and Clinical Respiratory Journal. Recently she received the EAACI Paul Ehrlich award for improving experimental research. She is honorary member of EAACI, the Spanish and Roumanian Rhinologic Society. She is married and has three children.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 24 Nov 2017 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

The unfolding story of HLA-E (G.Gillespie/L.Walters) & Showing restraint: NK cell regulation of HIV-1 broadly neutralising antibody induction (I.Pedroza-Pacheco)

Dr Geraldine Gillespie, Lucy Walters, Dr Isabela Pedroza-Pacheco

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 24 Nov 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

Dynamic network models complement machine learning to improve cancer treatment

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Fri 24 Nov 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG, Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off South Parks and Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PT - 01865 272500, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

INT'L GUEST SPEAKER - Professor Thomas Braun MD, Director, Max Planck Inst for Heart & Lung Research : ‘Pathways controlling cardiac morphogenesis and skeletal muscle regeneration’

Professor Thomas Braun, Director at the Max-Planck-Institute for Heart and Lung Reseach

Thomas Braun, Max-Planck-Institute for Heart and Lung Research. Ludwigstr. 43, 61231 Bad Nauheim, Germany Congenital heart disease (CHD) represents the most prevalent inborn anomaly. Only a minority of CHD cases is attributed to genetic causes, suggesting a major role of environmental factors.... Read more

Thomas Braun, Max-Planck-Institute for Heart and Lung Research. Ludwigstr. 43, 61231 Bad Nauheim, Germany Congenital heart disease (CHD) represents the most prevalent inborn anomaly. Only a minority of CHD cases is attributed to genetic causes, suggesting a major role of environmental factors. Nonphysiological hypoxia during early pregnancy induces CHD, but the underlying reasons are unknown. We found that cells in the mouse heart tube are hypoxic, while cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) expressing ISL1 in the secondary heart field are normoxic. In ISL1+ CPCs, induction of hypoxic responses caused CHD by repressing Isl1 and activating Nkx2.5, resulting in decreased cell proliferation and enhanced cardiomyocyte specification leading to CHD. Mechanistically, hypoxia-induced arrest of Isl1+ CPC proliferation is due to complex formation of HIF1α with the Notch effector HES1 and the protein deacetylase SIRT1 at the Isl1 gene. Our results indicate that spatial differences in oxygenation of the developing heart serve as signals to control CPC expansion and cardiac morphogenesis. We propose that physiological hypoxia coordinates homeostasis of CPCs, providing mechanistic explanations for some nongenetic causes of CHD. Cardiomyocytes in the adult heart show a decline of differentiated functions and acquisition of immature, “embryonic” properties under various disease processes, which seems to protect cells from hypoxia by reduction of ATP consumption. Cardiomyocyte dedifferentiation in mice depends on the OSM receptor leading to the release of multiple cytokines including Reg3b, which is required for efficient homing of macrophages to the damaged myocardium. In a search for posttranscriptional regulatory processes controlling cardiomyocyte dedifferentiation, we identified miRNAs that suppress the FGFR and OSMR pathways, which are instrumental for the control of postnatal cardiomyocyte proliferation and dedifferentiation. In contrast to the heart muscle, skeletal muscles contain dedicated stem cells enabling muscle regeneration throughout adult life. We have conducted a large high-resolution mass spectrometry-based analysis of proteins expressed in satellite cells combined with a non-biased high-throughput lentiviral RNAi screen to analyze the function of chromatin-modifying enzymes in muscle stem cells. We discovered that skeletal muscle stem cells primarily carry facultative heterochromatin, which, after differentiation of satellite cells to myofibers, switches to a combination of euchromatin and constitutive heterochromatin. Inactivation of the chromatin modifier Suv4-20h1 in muscle stem cells results in widespread chromatin rearrangements and loss of PCR-dependent H3K27me3 modifications, which causes relocation of the MyoD locus from the nuclear periphery and precocious MyoD expression. Other epigenetic modifiers repress expression of components of the necroptosis pathway in muscle stem cells. Reduced expression of such modifiers under inflammatory conditions increases necroptosis of muscle stem cells and compromises skeletal muscle regeneration.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Fri 24 Nov 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

NDM Seminar Series

Henry Wellcome Building of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Seminar Rooms A&B, Roosevelt Drive OX3 7BN

Resistant Malaria & Hypoxia, HIF-2 and the Carotid Body

Professor Nicholas J White, Dr Tammie Bishop

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Kathryn Smith

Fri 24 Nov 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Science Career Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Chopping and changing: from microtome to drug hunter

Dr. Adrian Moore

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Alice Mayer

Mon 27 Nov 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Chondrocytes and snoRNAs: lost in translation?

Dr Mandy Peffers

Mandy Peffers undertook a degree in Animal Science at the University of Leeds, followed by a veterinary degree at The Royal Veterinary College, qualifying as a veterinarian in 1995. She then spent 11 years in industry, private practice and having a family before returning to academia to undertake a... Read more

Mandy Peffers undertook a degree in Animal Science at the University of Leeds, followed by a veterinary degree at The Royal Veterinary College, qualifying as a veterinarian in 1995. She then spent 11 years in industry, private practice and having a family before returning to academia to undertake a PhD entitled ‘Proteomic and transcriptomic signatures of cartilage ageing and disease’ in 2013. Further Wellcome Trust supported PDRA was on ‘A Systems Biology Approach to Musculoskeletal Ageing’ for which she was awarded a Fellowship of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons. She is currently a Wellcome Trust Clinical Intermediate Fellow studying ‘The role of small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) in cartilage ageing and disease’. Her particular research interests include the role of non-coding RNAs in cartilage ageing and osteoarthritis, understanding the pathogenesis of tendinopathy and identification of biomarkers for osteoarthritis. She is based at the University of Liverpool in the Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease were her small group which currently includes four PhD students.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Tue 28 Nov 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Mechanisms behind mammalian early embryogenesis in vitro and in vivo

Prof Magdalena Zernicka-Goetz

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

SEMINAR POSTPONED TO THE NEW YEAR DUE TO ILLNESS

Tue 28 Nov 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Wed 29 Nov 2017 from 11:00 to 12:30

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox seminar - Consenting conundrums in adolescent mental health

Mina Fazel

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 29 Nov 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Strubi seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting rooms A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

Structure-assisted Design of Universal Vaccines and Therapeutics against Influenza Virus

Dr Ian Wilson

Influenza virus remains a constant threat to global health. The 1918 H1N1 pandemic caused around 50 million deaths worldwide and up to 30-50% mortality has been reported for recent emerging viruses, such as H5N1 and H7N9, in those hospitalized. Therefore, there is an urgent need to design a much... Read more

Influenza virus remains a constant threat to global health. The 1918 H1N1 pandemic caused around 50 million deaths worldwide and up to 30-50% mortality has been reported for recent emerging viruses, such as H5N1 and H7N9, in those hospitalized. Therefore, there is an urgent need to design a much more effective vaccine to protect against the multiple subtypes and types of influenza virus. Until relatively recently, it was thought that antibodies to influenza virus were strain-specific and could protect only against highly related strains within the same subtype. However, since 2008, many potent human antibodies have been isolated that target the hemagglutinin glycoprotein (HA) and are much broader in their neutralization of influenza virus. We have determined crystal structures of a number of these broadly neutralizing human antibodies (bnAbs) and have shown that they bind to the highly conserved functional sites on the HA: the stem (fusion domain) and the receptor binding site. We have also determined structures of small proteins, peptides and small molecules that also bind to functional sites on the HA. Thus, structural and functional characterization of these bnAbs with the HA have provided exciting new opportunities for design of novel vaccines and therapeutics that afford greater protection against influenza virus.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Agata Krupa

Wed 29 Nov 2017 from 16:00 to 17:00

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, TDI seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Global Biochemical Profiling for Problem Solving in Biology and Disease

Saul H. Rosenberg, PhD.

The BCL-2 family proteins are central regulators of cell death. Anti-apoptotic members (e.g. BCL-2, BCL-XL, MCL-1) contribute to tumor initiation, disease progression and drug resistance. While these proteins represent attractive drug targets for anticancer therapy, antagonism of their function... Read more

The BCL-2 family proteins are central regulators of cell death. Anti-apoptotic members (e.g. BCL-2, BCL-XL, MCL-1) contribute to tumor initiation, disease progression and drug resistance. While these proteins represent attractive drug targets for anticancer therapy, antagonism of their function requires disruption of large surface area protein-protein interactions. We have used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based screening, parallel synthesis and structure-based design to develop small molecules that bind with high affinity to multiple anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family proteins including BCL-XL and BCL-2. The 1st-generation dual BCL-2/BCL-XL inhibitor navitoclax exhibited single-agent activity in patients with relapsed or refractory CLL. Platelets, however, are dependent on BCL-XL for survival and as predicted by preclinical data, clinical inhibition of BCL-XL by navitoclax induced a rapid, concentration-dependent and dose-limiting decrease in circulating platelets. Therefore, we re-engineered navitoclax using structure-guided rational design to create the highly potent, orally bioavailable and BCL-2–selective inhibitor venetoclax (ABT-199), which has recently been approved for the treatment of patients with high-risk relapsed-refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Bio: Saul Rosenberg is Senior Director of Oncology Discovery at AbbVie. He received his BS degree from MIT and then moved to the University of California at Berkeley where he earned a Ph.D. degree in organic chemistry in the laboratories of Professor Henry Rapoport. He began his career at Abbott (which became AbbVie in 2013) in the area of Cardiovascular Research where he discovered the renin inhibitor zankiren. He subsequently moved to the Oncology area and currently holds the title of Senior Director. In this capacity, he has overseen the advancement of multiple compounds to the status of clinical candidate, including the Bcl-2 family inhibitors navitoclax and venetoclax and the PARP inhibitor veliparib. He has authored more than 130 publications, is an inventor on 25 U.S. patents and has been invited speak at numerous venues. His current research efforts are focused on the areas of apoptosis, epigenetics and cell cycle regulation.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

Wed 29 Nov 2017 from 18:00 to 19:15

Mathematical Institute, Lecture Theatre 2, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Ann McPherson Memorial Lecture 2017

Clare Marx

Miss Clare Marx, has just finished a 3-year term as President of the Royal College of Surgeons of England, the first woman to have held the post in their 207 year history. During that time she was credited with changing the culture of the organisation to concentrate on a focus of excellence in... Read more

Miss Clare Marx, has just finished a 3-year term as President of the Royal College of Surgeons of England, the first woman to have held the post in their 207 year history. During that time she was credited with changing the culture of the organisation to concentrate on a focus of excellence in patient care, even when that meant challenging the profession to change. Both internally and externally she championed and encouraged clinical leadership, in particular the need for women to step into such roles. The world of medicine has changed slowly for women in the profession and there remain challenges to overcome. Clare Marx’s lecture will explore this history with a focus on institutional and personal challenges.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Ruth Loseby

Thu 30 Nov 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI, Basement meeting room, NDM Research Building, Headington OX3 7FZ

Bacterial infections and human cancer (exact title TBC)

Dr Francesco Boccellato

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 30 Nov 2017 from 12:30 to 13:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

“Molecular Regulation and Function of GATA2 in the Programming of Haemogenic Endothelium”

Tomasz Dobrzycki

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Butler

VIVA SEMINAR

Thu 30 Nov 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Acute General Medicine Firm A / Silver Star

Dr Aparna Pal, Dr Meena Bhatia, Dr Charlotte Frise, Dr Lucy Mackillop

Acute General Medicine Firm A: "Psychotic fatigue", Dr Aparna Pal -- Silver Star: "Pregnancy: should this be viewed as a vascular risk factor?", Dr Meena Bhatia, Dr Charlotte Frise and Dr Lucy Mackillop -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Acute General Medicine Firm A: "Psychotic fatigue", Dr Aparna Pal -- Silver Star: "Pregnancy: should this be viewed as a vascular risk factor?", Dr Meena Bhatia, Dr Charlotte Frise and Dr Lucy Mackillop -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 30 Nov 2017 from 14:30 to 15:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Discovery of Novel and Misfit Lipids that Control Human Macrophage Activation and T cell Response

Professor Branch Moody

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer