Seminars

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Wed 22 Jan 2020 from 09:30 to 11:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences Seminars & Workshops

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

What does it mean to engage research in policy: A case study of Brexit & Healthcare

Dr Nicholas Fahy

Nick is a researcher and consultant in health policy and systems, looking at how health systems work; what can be learned by comparing health systems across countries; and how to bring about constructive change in health systems. Nick’s background is in international health policy, including over... Read more

Nick is a researcher and consultant in health policy and systems, looking at how health systems work; what can be learned by comparing health systems across countries; and how to bring about constructive change in health systems. Nick’s background is in international health policy, including over a decade in the European Commission, most recently as head of unit for health information – a short title for a unit which covered a lot of topics, including generating and mobilising information, data and knowledge for European health policy; leading European policy on major, rare and non-communicable diseases; and some other issues such as e-health. This currently leads to his work on the health impact of Brexit, as well as wider health policy.

Audience: Members of the University and the public

Organisers: Daniel Long

Wed 22 Jan 2020 from 12:30 to 13:30

WHG Lunchtime Lab Talks

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

Davies & Knight Lunchtime Lab Talks

Dr Gabriele Migliorini, Dr Ping Zhang, Dr Samy AlGhadban, Dr Amine Bouchareb

Davies Group Speaker 1: Dr Amine Bouchareb Title: Destabilizing Cas9 to address CRISPR mosaicism Speaker 2: Dr Samy Alghadban Title: Engineering the genome without cutting: base editing and prime editing Knight Group Speaker 1: Dr Gabriele Migliorini Title: Enumerating Multi-way Chromosome... Read more

Davies Group Speaker 1: Dr Amine Bouchareb Title: Destabilizing Cas9 to address CRISPR mosaicism Speaker 2: Dr Samy Alghadban Title: Engineering the genome without cutting: base editing and prime editing Knight Group Speaker 1: Dr Gabriele Migliorini Title: Enumerating Multi-way Chromosome Conformation Interactions at Immuno-specific GWAS loci Speaker 2: Dr Ping Zhang Title: Innate immune activity reprograms the epigenome and transcriptome in human iPSC-derived macrophages

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Wed 22 Jan 2020 from 13:00 to 18:30

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7FY

Oxford Medical Sciences Imaging Symposium 2020 (MSIS): "Advanced Tissue Imaging: from Single Cells to Whole Organs"

Prof Shankar Srinivas, Prof Matthias Gunzer, Prof Anja Erinka Hauser, Prof Emad Moeendarbary, Prof Johann Danzl, Prof Alain Chedotal, Dr Junyu Chen

We aim to attract the breadth of the latest applications and developments in the imaging community in the UK and world-wide. We want to bring together Oxford's imaging scientists and international leaders, engaging with transformative technologies and methodologies likely defining biomedical... Read more

We aim to attract the breadth of the latest applications and developments in the imaging community in the UK and world-wide. We want to bring together Oxford's imaging scientists and international leaders, engaging with transformative technologies and methodologies likely defining biomedical imaging in the years to come. This represents a unique opportunity for our DPhil students, Postdocs, and PIs to network and form a platform for collaborations, keeping Oxford's Medical Sciences at the forefront of international imaging. The MSIS meeting extends the former NDORMS Imaging Symposium to a larger interest group across Oxford.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Jo Silva

Further detailed information as well as information on platinum and silver sponsoring and exhibition please contact volodymyr.nechyporuk-zloy@kennedy.ox.ac.uk, anjali.kusumbe@kennedy.ox.ac.uk, or marco.fritzsche@rdm.ox.ac.uk.

Thu 23 Jan 2020 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Adult Intensive Care Unit / Acute General Medicine Firm A

Dr Matthew Giles, Dr Conrad Groenewald, Dr Jon Salmon

Adult Intensive Care Unit: "Burning Man or Breaking Bad?", Dr Conrad Groenewald and Dr Jon Salmon -- Acute General Medicine Firm A: "Acute Medicine in Oxford. Are we going to the dogs or ambulating off into the sunset?", Dr Matthew Giles -- Chair: Prof Richard Cornall

Adult Intensive Care Unit: "Burning Man or Breaking Bad?", Dr Conrad Groenewald and Dr Jon Salmon -- Acute General Medicine Firm A: "Acute Medicine in Oxford. Are we going to the dogs or ambulating off into the sunset?", Dr Matthew Giles -- Chair: Prof Richard Cornall

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 23 Jan 2020 from 13:00 to 14:00

Jenner Seminars

NDM Building, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Efficacy of ChAdOx1-vectored vaccines against Nipah virus and MERS-CoV in animal challenge models

Dr Neeltje van Doremalen

Neeltje Van Doremaalen is a senior scientist and resident expert at the NIH on Emerging and Outbreak pathogens.

Neeltje Van Doremaalen is a senior scientist and resident expert at the NIH on Emerging and Outbreak pathogens.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Lisbeth Soederberg

Thu 23 Jan 2020 from 14:00 to 15:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

‘Single cell epigenome landscape of development and ageing’.

Professor Wolf Reik

Wolf Reik obtained his MD from the University of Hamburg. He did his thesis work with Rudolf Jaenisch, and postdoctoral work with Azim Surani in Cambridge. He became a Fellow of the Lister Institute of Preventive Medicine at Cambridge and subsequently the Head of the Epigenetics Programme at the... Read more

Wolf Reik obtained his MD from the University of Hamburg. He did his thesis work with Rudolf Jaenisch, and postdoctoral work with Azim Surani in Cambridge. He became a Fellow of the Lister Institute of Preventive Medicine at Cambridge and subsequently the Head of the Epigenetics Programme at the Babraham Institute in Cambridge and its Associate Director. He is honorary Professor of Epigenetics at the University of Cambridge and Associate Faculty at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, where he is a founding member of the Centre for Single Cell Genomics. His research interests are in mammalian epigenetics, particularly in epigenetic reprogramming during mammalian development and its role in stem cell biology and inheritance. He has published more than 180 research articles and has an h-factor of 88. He won the Wellcome Prize in Physiology and is a member of EMBO and the Academia Europaea, and a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences and the Royal Society.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Alexandra Ward

Fri 24 Jan 2020 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Gaza – Oxford teaching in the Occupied Palestinian Territories

Mr Nick Maynard, Dr Richard Harrington, Professor Andrew Wilkinson, Dr Debbie Harrington, Dr Brenda Kelly

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 24 Jan 2020 from 11:00 to 12:00

TDI Seminar Series

NDM Building, Seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

High-throughput mass spectrometry for drug discovery

Professor Matthias Trost

Matthias Trost is a proteomics expert with interests in innate immunity and drug discovery. He studied chemistry in Freiburg, Germany and Manchester, UK. He has a PhD in Cellular Microbiology & Proteomics from the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany and was a postdoctoral... Read more

Matthias Trost is a proteomics expert with interests in innate immunity and drug discovery. He studied chemistry in Freiburg, Germany and Manchester, UK. He has a PhD in Cellular Microbiology & Proteomics from the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany and was a postdoctoral fellow with Michel Desjardins and with Pierre Thibault, Institute for Research in Immunology and Cancer, Montreal, Canada. In 2010, he became Programme Leader and Head of Proteomics at the MRC Protein Phosphorylation & Ubiquitylation Unit at the University of Dundee, UK. Since 2017, he is Professor of Proteomics at Newcastle University. Matthias’s research utilises mass spectrometry and proteomics to understand innate immunity in macrophages. He also has a strong interest in drug discovery for which his lab pioneered high-throughput MALDI TOF mass spectrometry approaches. In 2019, he was given a Wellcome Investigator Award to study how ubiquitylation regulates innate immune functions at the phagosome of macrophages.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Kilian Huber

Fri 24 Jan 2020 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Insights into the regulation of human coronary microvascular flow

Professor Kim Dora

Studies of ex vivo human intramyocardial coronary arteries have been used to establish links between human arterial structure, function, and protein expression.

Studies of ex vivo human intramyocardial coronary arteries have been used to establish links between human arterial structure, function, and protein expression.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Duncan Sparrow

Fri 24 Jan 2020 from 14:00 to 15:00

Mathematical Biology and Ecology

Mathematical Institute, L3, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Mathematical modelling as part of an HIV clinical trial in sub-Saharan Africa

Dr Will Probert

Globally, almost 38 million people are living with HIV. HPTN 071 (PopART) is the largest HIV prevention trial to date, taking place in 21 communities in Zambia and South Africa with a combined population of more than 1 million people. As part of the trial an individual-based mathematical model... Read more

Globally, almost 38 million people are living with HIV. HPTN 071 (PopART) is the largest HIV prevention trial to date, taking place in 21 communities in Zambia and South Africa with a combined population of more than 1 million people. As part of the trial an individual-based mathematical model was developed to help in planning the trial, to help interpret the results of the trial, and to make projections both into the future and to areas where the trial did not take place. In this talk I will outline the individual-based mathematical model used in the trial, the inference framework, and will discuss examples of how the results from the model have been used to help inform policy decisions.

Audience: Public

Mon 27 Jan 2020 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, The Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7FY

Regulation of innate immune responses by the TPL-2 complex

Professor Steve Ley

Audience: Public

Organisers: Jennifer Pope

Tue 28 Jan 2020 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Tue 28 Jan 2020 from 16:30 to 18:00

Placebos: what, why, and how: an interdisciplinary graduate seminar

Radcliffe Humanities, Lecture Room, 2nd floor, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

What is a placebo (in a clinical trial)?

Dr Jeremy Howick

Dates: Weeks 1-8, Hilary Term 2020 (starting 21 January) Location: Lecture Room, 2nd floor, Radcliffe Humanities Building, Woodstock Road, OX2 6GG Time: Tuesdays 16:30—18:00 How to resister (places limited): Email jeremy.howick@philosophy.ox.ac.uk Who it is for: Graduate students, and... Read more

Dates: Weeks 1-8, Hilary Term 2020 (starting 21 January) Location: Lecture Room, 2nd floor, Radcliffe Humanities Building, Woodstock Road, OX2 6GG Time: Tuesdays 16:30—18:00 How to resister (places limited): Email jeremy.howick@philosophy.ox.ac.uk Who it is for: Graduate students, and postdoctoral fellows in any area of philosophy or medicine. Jargon will be avoided, so no prerequisites other than a desire to learn and discuss issues related to placebos are required. About the seminar series Whether the treatments we take are believed to be ‘effective’ often depends on whether they are better than ‘placebos’ in clinical trials. Understanding what placebos are is therefore important for human health. In spite of this, a great deal of confusion surrounds what placebos are. Contrary to commonly held beliefs, placebos are neither inert nor inactive, and they can have specific effects, especially for treating pain. Following on from the confusions about what they are, debates rage about how to measure their effects, and whether doctors can ethically use them in clinical practice, and whether placebo-controlled trials are ethical if we have an established treatment. In this seminar series, led by Dr. Jeremy Howick, graduate students will read and discuss the meaning of placebos, how to measure their effects, and whether they are ethical. Outline of seminars Seminar 1. Introduction, brief history of placebos (in clinical practice) and a note on method. Seminar 2. What is a placebo (in a clinical trial)? Seminar 3. Measurement errors in measuring placebo and nocebo effects. Seminar 4. Special problems with measuring placebos Seminar 5. Double blinding: the importance of being in the dark. Seminar 6: How placebos and nocebos work: a case study of pain. Seminar 7. The ethics of placebos and nocebos in clinical trials and clinical practice Seminar 8. Where placebo research needs to go Readings Based on Dr Howick’s forthcoming book; will be emailed to those who register. About Dr. Howick Oxford philosopher and medical Researcher Dr. Jeremy Howick has done 15 years of research on evidence-based medicine, placebo effects, and empathy. He has published 3 books, almost 100 peer-reviewed articles, and is the director of the Oxford University Empathy Programme, whose mission is ‘to introduce a dose of empathy into all healthcare consultations’. He communicates regularly with the public and has written a book for non-academic audiences called Doctor You. He has appeared on the BBC, ITV, and Channel 4, and his research has been featured in The Guardian, The Times, Men’s Health, the Daily Mail, the Huffington Post, and The Conversation. FAQ Q: What if I can only attend some of the seminars? A: That is okay. While it is better to attend all the seminars, each seminar will be independent to a great extent. About the Oxford Philosophy and Medicine Seminars In the Oxford Philosophy and Medicine seminars, we explore topics that are both philosophically interesting, and also relevant to medical research or practice, and the core readings draw on the philosophical as well as the medical literature. The first seminar series was held at All Souls in and covered the Philosophy of Evidence-Based Medicine. In this seminar series, we will explore the what placebos are (ontology), how to measure their effects (epistemology), and whether they are ethical.

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 29 Jan 2020 from 10:00 to 12:00

Bodleian iSkills - Workshops in Information Discovery and Scholarly Communications

Social Science Library, Information Skills Training Room, Manor Road OX1 3UQ

Bodleian iSkills: Managing research data and Data Management Planning (DMPs)

John Southall, Catherine Scutt

Good research data management is a vital component of academic practice. Part of this is the principle that the data used to develop the arguments and outcomes of your research should be effectively stored and managed during a project, preserved for the future and - where possible - shared with... Read more

Good research data management is a vital component of academic practice. Part of this is the principle that the data used to develop the arguments and outcomes of your research should be effectively stored and managed during a project, preserved for the future and - where possible - shared with other academics. This session introduces the University’s research data policy and outlines the practical impact this will have on your work. The services available at Oxford to assist you will be outlined. This session is not only essential during your current studies but will be invaluable if you plan to continue in research as a career. The session will cover: common dangers and pitfalls of digital data; key principles of RDM and organising your data effectively; data management plans; institutional, funder and publisher requirements; issues around preserving data and cybersecurity; ORA-Data, Github and other preservation services; Oxford based tools for research data management; and will invite you to share thoughts and insights about the potential of data management in your own field. Intended Audience: All DPhil students and research staff

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Helen Bond

Wed 29 Jan 2020 from 12:30 to 13:30

WebLearn and Turnitin

11-13 Banbury Road

Plagiarism: Awareness and avoidance (for students)

Jill Fresen

How do you spot unintentional plagiarism in your work? Submit a piece of your own into Turnitin! This one-hour session is aimed at postgraduate students and provides support in learning how to avoid unintentional plagiarism. You will have a chance to put a piece of your own writing through Turnitin and interpret the results. (Note that specialist discipline-specific guidance is not provided)

How do you spot unintentional plagiarism in your work? Submit a piece of your own into Turnitin! This one-hour session is aimed at postgraduate students and provides support in learning how to avoid unintentional plagiarism. You will have a chance to put a piece of your own writing through Turnitin and interpret the results. (Note that specialist discipline-specific guidance is not provided)

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 30 Jan 2020 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, NDMRB (TDI) seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

“Role of AHR in intestinal injury repair”

Prof. Gitta Stockinger

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Alexandra Ward

Thu 30 Jan 2020 from 16:00 to 17:00

Centre for Personalised Medicine Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

Some constraints on the scope and potential of personalised medicine

Professor George Davey Smith

Biography George Davey Smith was a member of the noise-terrorism outfit Scum Auxiliary in the early 1980s. Since artistic and commercial success eluded them, he has had to earn his living working as an epidemiologist in the provinces.

Biography George Davey Smith was a member of the noise-terrorism outfit Scum Auxiliary in the early 1980s. Since artistic and commercial success eluded them, he has had to earn his living working as an epidemiologist in the provinces.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Catherine Lidbetter

Thu 30 Jan 2020 from 18:00 to 19:00

Population Health Seminars

Sheldonian Theatre, Broad Street OX1 3AZ

An Oxford Conversation: the impact of fake news on our lives

Simon Stevens, Damian Collins MP, Sarah Montague

Join Sir Simon Stevens, Chief Executive of NHS England, Damian Collins MP, and Sarah Montague, presenter of BBC Radio 4’s World at One for a discussion about the impact of fake news on our lives. Damian Collins has stated that ‘Democracy is at risk from the malicious and relentless targeting of... Read more

Join Sir Simon Stevens, Chief Executive of NHS England, Damian Collins MP, and Sarah Montague, presenter of BBC Radio 4’s World at One for a discussion about the impact of fake news on our lives. Damian Collins has stated that ‘Democracy is at risk from the malicious and relentless targeting of citizens with disinformation’, while Simon Stevens has raised concerns about its effects on vaccination rates with the UK recently losing its measles-free status. The House of Commons Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee report on Disinformation and Fake News painted a bleak picture of the ways that social media platforms are involved in the spread of disinformation in their pursuit of profits. Our speakers will discuss why this matters and how these issues might best be addressed, not only by technology companies but also by governments, policy-makers, the public and other relevant parties.

Booking Recommended

Audience: Public

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Fri 31 Jan 2020 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Surgical Grand Rounds

Dr Andrew Brent, Dr Katie Jeffery

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 31 Jan 2020 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Title TBC

Ho Group

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 31 Jan 2020 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Conflict or Complement: parallel memories control behaviour in the wee fly

Prof. Scott Waddell

Drosophila can learn to associate odours with reward or punishment and the resulting memories direct odour-specific approach or avoidance behaviours. Recent progress has revealed a straightforward model for learning in which reinforcing dopaminergic neurons assign valence to odour representations... Read more

Drosophila can learn to associate odours with reward or punishment and the resulting memories direct odour-specific approach or avoidance behaviours. Recent progress has revealed a straightforward model for learning in which reinforcing dopaminergic neurons assign valence to odour representations in the neural ensemble of the mushroom bodies. Dopamine directed synaptic depression alters the route of odour-driven activity through the mushroom body output network. This circuit configuration and influence of internal state guide the expression of appropriate behaviour. Importantly, learned behaviour is flexible and can be updated as the fly accumulates additional experience. Our latest studies demonstrate that well-informed behaviour is guided by combining parallel conflicting and complementary memories of opposite valence.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Duncan Sparrow