Seminars

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Mon 25 Mar 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Signal transduction by caveolae mechanics

Prof Christophe Lamaze

We have established that caveolae are dynamic mechanosensors that buffer cell membrane tension variations to protect the cell against mechanical stress. We have now investigated the role of caveolae mechanics in cell signaling. We found that the mechanical disassembly of caveolae increases the... Read more

We have established that caveolae are dynamic mechanosensors that buffer cell membrane tension variations to protect the cell against mechanical stress. We have now investigated the role of caveolae mechanics in cell signaling. We found that the mechanical disassembly of caveolae increases the amount of non caveolar caveolin-1 at the plasma membrane and releases the EHD2 ATPase from the neck of caveolae. I will show how these two events are critically involved in the regulation of JAK/STAT signaling and gene transcription. Our data link for the first time caveolae mechanosensing to intracellular signaling and establish caveolae as key mechanosignaling devices. ---- Christophe Lamaze is a former resident in medical biology who graduated in Pharmacy (Paris V University) and in Cell Biology (Paris XI University). He is Director of Research, 1st Class at INSERM and Deputy Director of the "Cellular & Chemical Biology" Department at the Institut Curie, where he heads the laboratory "Membrane Mechanics and Dynamics of Intracellular Signaling". Early on, he focused his research on endocytosis and intracellular trafficking. As a post-doctoral fellow with Dr. SL Schmid at the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, California (1992-97), he established the key role of endocytosis in intracellular signaling (Science 1996; Nature 1996), a pioneering work opening a new field of investigation, and leading to the concept of the “signaling endosome”. In 1997, he joined the Institut Pasteur where he characterized the first clathrin-independent endocytosis known today as the FEME pathway (Mol. Cell 2001). He set up his own team at the Institut Curie in 2001 to study the role of cell membranes dynamics in signaling, focusing on the interferon receptor and JAK/STAT signaling (Cell, 2016, Nature Commun. 2016). In 2011, his team established that caveolae are mechanosensors that provide protection for cells under mechanical stress (Cell 2011).

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

CANCELLED

Tue 26 Mar 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

MHU Student Presentations

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 26 Mar 2019 from 17:30 to 18:30

Population Health Seminars

Sheldonian Theatre, Broad Street OX1 3AZ

NDPH special event: Women and Leadership: Fighting for an equal world

Julia Gillard

Julia Gillard was the prime minister of Australia from 2010-2013. She was the first woman to serve as Australia’s prime minister. In October 2012 she received worldwide attention for her speech in Parliament on the treatment of women in professional and public life. Julia Gillard has a... Read more

Julia Gillard was the prime minister of Australia from 2010-2013. She was the first woman to serve as Australia’s prime minister. In October 2012 she received worldwide attention for her speech in Parliament on the treatment of women in professional and public life. Julia Gillard has a longstanding commitment to expanding access and quality to education worldwide and to supporting girls and women fulfil their potential. Some of her current activities include serving as a patron of CAMFED, the Campaign for Female Education and chairing the Global Partnership for Education. She will be talking at the Sheldonian Theatre, Oxford, on Tuesday 26 March, at 5.30-6.30pm on “Women and Leadership - Fighting for an equal world“.

Booking Recommended

Audience: Public

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 27 Mar 2019 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Dissecting the role of programmed cell death-1 receptor (PD-1) in the immune system

Dr Shoba Amarnath

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Wed 27 Mar 2019 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

LRRK2 Mediated Cellular Function from Vesicular Trafficking to Gene Expression

Professor Kirsten Harvey

My research has focused on two main aspects of neurobiology, the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s and trapping and accumulation of inhibitory receptors at synapses. In my laboratory, we employ cell biological, biochemistry and proteomic techniques in an effort to: i) discover how pathogenic mutations... Read more

My research has focused on two main aspects of neurobiology, the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s and trapping and accumulation of inhibitory receptors at synapses. In my laboratory, we employ cell biological, biochemistry and proteomic techniques in an effort to: i) discover how pathogenic mutations in PARK genes lead to neuronal death, ii) uncover new leads for genetic analysis, and iii) identify new therapeutic targets for disease modifying treatment. My current research focus is on the physiological and pathological role of the Parkinson’s protein LRRK2 in Wnt signalling and cytoskeletal function. In addition, I continue to research the role of proteins important for receptor clustering such as gephyrin and collybistin in inhibitory receptor clustering and intellectual disability.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Thu 28 Mar 2019 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Causal Inference in Epidemiology Seminar - Statistical concepts: a grammar for research

Prof David Cox

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Thu 28 Mar 2019 from 16:00 to 17:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Organisation and turnover of developmental regulatory elements in Metazoan genomes

Prof. Boris Lenhard

Syntenic arrays of extremely conserved non-coding elements (CNEs) regulate key developmental genes in multiple diverse Metazoan lineages. Due to a lack of sequence conservation between CNEs across distant lineages, it has been proposed that this form of long-range gene regulation has been acquired... Read more

Syntenic arrays of extremely conserved non-coding elements (CNEs) regulate key developmental genes in multiple diverse Metazoan lineages. Due to a lack of sequence conservation between CNEs across distant lineages, it has been proposed that this form of long-range gene regulation has been acquired independently in multiple lineages. Our alternative hypothesis is that while these sequences are extremely conserved within a lineage, no sequence is totally indispensable and therefore given enough time, sequence turnover within CNEs would make their identification between lineages impossible. By analysing deeply and shallowly conserved arrays of CNEs, known as genomic regulatory blocks (GRBs), in three metazoan lineages, and find that in all three, deeply and shallowly conserved GRBs target distinct subsets of genes: the most conserved GRBs regulate mostly developmental transcription factors, and the least conserved regulating cell adhesion molecules and neural developmental genes. Even shallowly conserved GRBs often have CNEs in all three lineages, arguing in favour of their ancient origin and divergence by turnover rather than lineage-specific emergence. Deeply and shallowly conserved GRBs also differ in the timing of their expression during development, their chromatin state and their repeat content. This suggest that GRB-like gene regulation of animal development has an ancient origin, and that the rate of regulatory region turnover within GRBs is influenced by the pleiotropy of the gene under regulation.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Supat Thongjuea

If you would like to speak to Prof. Lenhard, please contact supat.thongjuea@imm.ox.ac.uk

Fri 29 Mar 2019 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Deciphering Mechanisms of Perceptual Silencing: From Molecules to Neural Systems

Mani Ramaswami

We and our collaborators seek to understand molecular mechanisms of long-term memory in identified elements of a memory-encoding circuit in vivo. Our work on the Drosophila olfactory system has a) outlined a simple neural circuit that encodes habituation memory; b) identified likely components and... Read more

We and our collaborators seek to understand molecular mechanisms of long-term memory in identified elements of a memory-encoding circuit in vivo. Our work on the Drosophila olfactory system has a) outlined a simple neural circuit that encodes habituation memory; b) identified likely components and assembly mechanisms for neuronal ribonucleoprotein (RNP) granules; and c) shown how translational control mechanisms and RNP granules participate in mnemonic processes. Our studies indicate that olfactory habituation arises from the potentiation of inhibitory synapses from a sparse group of local interneurons onto excitatory output neurons in the antennal lobe. The underlying synaptic plasticity mechanism, scaled up from small to large circuits, can create negative images (or inhibitory engrams) of object-encoding cell assemblies and so potentially account for habituation across systems and species. This “negative-image model,” recently supported by observations in the mammalian auditory cortex, explains the key behavioral features of habituation (“gating” and “override”) better than any other current model. I will end by discussing arguments developed in collaboration with colleagues in Oxford, which suggest that inhibitory memory engrams, similar to those involved in habituation, can convert recently encoded memories into latent remote memories that remain accessible to recall, and speculate on possible implications for the function and physiology of sleep, atypical psychiatric states, and dreaming.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods