coronavirus
 

During the developing COVID-19 pandemic, The Nuffield Department of Medicine is taking measures to prevent the spread of the disease. Departments are instructed by the University's Registrar to work from home and manage building closures.

This is to restrict any contact between individuals as far as possible. The University remains open and operating as far as possible with the following restrictions:

  • Only essential activities should continue on site (e.g. research relating to Covid-19 or that of national importance, or the maintenance of research equipment and animal welfare). Departments are responsible for defining what is essential, in line with divisional guidance, and should provide appropriate operating procedures. PVC Research will be in touch with Divisions to assist in drawing up guidance.
  • Other research and teaching continues remotely where possible and students return home (if possible and where that has not already happened)
  • Departments physically close except where essential activities have to be done on site. Staff work remotely where possible. Only core support functions and other essential activities continue on site and only with critical staff on site – e.g. building access and maintenance, security, animal welfare, maintenance of research equipment.

Key Information for Staff

Latest News

Global clinical trial of 40,000+ healthcare workers begins to test in UK if chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine can prevent COVID-19

Global clinical trial of 40,000+ healthcare workers begins to test in UK if chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine can prevent COVID-19

Posted 21/05/2020

A global study to test if either chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine can prevent COVID-19 in vital frontline healthcare workers will open to UK participants at hospital sites in Brighton and Oxford today.  Led by the Mahidol Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit (MORU) in Bangkok, Thailand, the COPCOV study is a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial that will enrol 40,000+ frontline healthcare workers and staff from Europe, Africa, Asia and South America who have close contact with patients with COVID-19 to determine definitively if chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine are effective in preventing COVID-19.  “COVID-19 is a major risk for frontline healthcare workers around the world,” said COPCOV Co-Principal Investigator Professor Sir Nicholas White

How to set up a trial in nine days

How to set up a trial in nine days

Posted 20/05/2020

The Randomised Evaluation of COVid-19 thERapY (RECOVERY) Trial has recruited more than 10,000 patients in 176 hospitals in just two months - truly incredible figures for that timescale, making it the fastest ever recruiting individually randomised controlled trial. From conception to launch took just nine days! The trial is being co-led by NDM's Professor Peter Horby  and Professor Martin Landray from the Nuffield Department of Population Health (NDPH), and is testing existing drugs, all with well-known side effects and confirmed safety, on hospital inpatients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19.

Prof Xin Lu honoured by the Royal Society

Prof Xin Lu honoured by the Royal Society

Posted 13/05/2020

The Royal Society, the UK’s distinguished academy of science, has announced the election of 62 new Fellows and Foreign Members, which now includes Professor Xin Lu FMedSci FRS 
Xin Lu is a cancer biologist distinguished by her contributions to understanding cellular pathways that control cell fate in development and disease, particularly cancer. She has a long-standing interest in how to selectively kill cancer cells, and her major research advances have provided insights into how p53, the most mutated or inactivated tumour suppressor in human cancers, can make life or death decisions for a cell.

Chan Zuckerberg Initiative awards funding to Oxford team to support inflammation research

Chan Zuckerberg Initiative awards funding to Oxford team to support inflammation research

Posted 01/05/2020

NDM's Dr Anita Milicic from the Jenner Institute, Old Road Campus Research Buillding and Dr Calliope Dendrou from the Wellcome Centre for Human Genetics, are part of a group with Professor Mark Coles from the Kennedy Institute who have received a share of $14 million in funding from the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative as one of 29 projects that will explore emerging ideas regarding the role of inflammation in disease.  The Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI) was founded by Dr. Priscilla Chan and Mark Zuckerberg in 2015, to leverage technology to help solve some of the world’s toughest challenges. These grants build on CZI’s work in single-cell biology supporting the Human Cell Atlas, a fundamental reference for health and disease.

News Archive

 Research Highlight

Ethics of instantaneous contact tracing using mobile phone apps in the control of the COVID-19 pandemic

Ethics of instantaneous contact tracing using mobile phone apps in the control of the COVID-19 pandemic

Posted 28/05/2020

The team's latest paper published in The Journal of Medical Ethics, summarises how the successful and appropriate use of the app as an intervention relies on the ability to command well-founded public trust and confidence. This applies to the use of the app itself and of the data.  "There are well-founded public concerns on the implications of digital tracing and these have been included in our consideration and conceptualisation of the app's configuration since inception," explains Professor Christophe Fraser, co-lead on the mobile contact tracing app team.

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Public Engagement

Podcast: Meet our Researchers

sarahn gilbert

Viral vectored vaccine development

Professor Sarah Gilbert has been making and testing vaccines designed to induce T cell responses for ten years, chiefly using antigens from malaria and influenza. Based at the Jenner Institute, several of the vaccines developed in Professor Gilbert’s laboratory have progressed into Clinical Trials.

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