Research

Research

Research in NDM

The department supports investigator-led research through a series of well-founded laboratories. This research covers every aspect of biological science related to medicine: from the bench to the bedside, from blue sky to full clinical trials, from technology development to spin-out. It covers many fields and many clinical disciplines.

Researchers

The department supports this research in an environment designed to foster the long-term career development of fellows and research staff.

All of the above is made possible through the generosity and long-term support of our sponsors and funders.

Research Highlights

Development of a highly protective Zika vaccine through modulation of antigen membrane anchors

Development of a highly protective Zika vaccine through modulation of antigen membrane anchors

Posted 26/06/2018

The leading Oxford’s chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine platform has been engineered as a Zika vaccine, opening the door to clinical trials at the University of Oxford and Mexico. The development was published in Nature Communications in a multinational team effort lead by Prof. Arturo Reyes-Sandoval, the Jenner Institute (NDM) in collaboration with Imperial College London, University of Glasgow, Harvard Medical School, and the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation in Brazil.

Development and validation of response markers to predict survival and pleurodesis success in patients with malignant pleural effusion (PROMISE): a multicohort analysis

Development and validation of response markers to predict survival and pleurodesis success in patients with malignant pleural effusion (PROMISE): a multicohort analysis

Posted 18/06/2018

The prevalence of malignant pleural effusion is increasing worldwide, but prognostic biomarkers to plan treatment and to understand the underlying mechanisms of disease progression remain unidentified. The PROMISE study was designed with the objectives to discover, validate, and prospectively assess biomarkers of survival and pleurodesis response in malignant pleural effusion and build a score that predicts survival.

Research Highlights archives