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In this study we assessed first-line anti-tuberculosis drug resistance and the genotypic distribution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) isolates that had been collected from consecutive new tuberculosis patients enrolled in two clinical trials conducted in Guinea between 2005 and 2010. Among the total 359 MTBC strains that were analyzed in this study, 22.8% were resistant to at least one of the first line anti-tuberculosis drugs, including 2.5% multidrug resistance and 17.5% isoniazid resistance, with or without other drugs. In addition, further characterization of isolates from a subset of the two trials (n = 184) revealed a total of 80 different spoligotype patterns, 29 "orphan" and 51 shared patterns. We identified the six major MTBC lineages of human relevance, with predominance of the Euro-American lineage. In total, 132 (71.7%) of the strains were genotypically clustered, and further analysis (using the DESTUS model) suggesting significantly faster spread of LAM10_CAM family (p = 0.00016). In conclusion, our findings provide a first insight into drug resistance and the population structure of the MTBC in Guinea, with relevance for public health scientists in tuberculosis control programs.

Original publication

DOI

10.1016/j.meegid.2015.05.022

Type

Journal article

Journal

Infection, genetics and evolution : journal of molecular epidemiology and evolutionary genetics in infectious diseases

Publication Date

07/2015

Volume

33

Pages

314 - 319

Addresses

Institute of Tropical Medicine (ITM), Antwerp, Belgium; University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.

Keywords

Humans, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Bacteremia, Tuberculosis, Tuberculosis, Multidrug-Resistant, Tuberculosis, Pulmonary, Antitubercular Agents, Microbial Sensitivity Tests, Prevalence, Drug Resistance, Microbial, Guinea