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BACKGROUND: Little is known about how primary care physicians (PCPs) in Asia diagnose and manage prostatitis-like symptoms. This study investigated the clinical diagnosis of and care provided for prostatitis-like symptoms by PCPs in a Malaysian population, and compared these findings to reports from other areas. METHODS: All members of the Penang Private Medical Practitioners' Society were asked to complete a self-administered survey. Nonresponders were contacted after 3 weeks and received a telephone request after 6 weeks. RESULTS: Of the 786 practitioners contacted, 669 considered themselves to be PCPs, including 279 (42%) who responded to the survey. Adult males with prostatitis-like symptoms typically constitute <1% of the patients seen by PCPs. Most PCPs (72%) believe that prostatitis-like symptoms are caused by bacterial infection. 61% of PCPs base their diagnosis of prostatitis-like symptoms on clinical history, a physical examination and dipstick urinalysis. Standard management was to prescribe 1 or 2 courses of antimicrobials. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the 8.7% prevalence found in a previous survey in this population, prostatitis remains underdiagnosed in Malaysia. In contrast to many other clinical settings, urologists in Malaysia see a large proportion of newly diagnosed and treatment-naive prostatitis patients, providing an opportunity for clinical diagnostic and treatment studies.

Original publication

DOI

10.1159/000176022

Type

Journal article

Journal

Urol Int

Publication Date

2009

Volume

82

Pages

32 - 37

Keywords

Adult, Anti-Infective Agents, Attitude of Health Personnel, Bacteriological Techniques, Female, Health Care Surveys, Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice, Humans, Malaysia, Male, Physical Examination, Physical Therapy Modalities, Practice Patterns, Physicians', Prevalence, Primary Health Care, Prostatitis, Reagent Strips, Referral and Consultation, Surveys and Questionnaires, Urinalysis, Urine, Urodynamics, Urology