Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

BACKGROUND: This study determined the long-term outcome after colectomy for acute severe ulcerative colitis (ASUC) and assessed whether the duration of in-hospital medical therapy is related to postoperative outcome. METHODS: All patients who underwent urgent colectomy and ileostomy for ASUC between 1994 and 2000 were identified from a prospective database. Patient details, preoperative therapy and complications to last follow-up were recorded. RESULTS: Eighty patients were identified, who were treated with intravenous steroids for a median of 6 (range 1-22) days before surgery. Twenty-three (29 per cent) also received intravenous ciclosporin. There were 23 complications in 22 patients in the initial postoperative period. Sixty-eight patients underwent further planned surgery, including restorative ileal pouch-anal anastomosis in 57. During a median follow-up of 5.4 (range 0.5-9.0) years, 48 patients (60 per cent) developed at least one complication. Patients with a major complication at any time during follow-up had a significantly longer duration of medical therapy before colectomy than patients with no major complications (median 8 versus 5 days; P = 0.036). CONCLUSION: Delayed surgery for patients with ASUC who do not respond to medical therapy is associated with an increased risk of postoperative complications.

Original publication

DOI

10.1002/bjs.6874

Type

Journal article

Journal

Br J Surg

Publication Date

03/2010

Volume

97

Pages

404 - 409

Keywords

Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Child, Colitis, Ulcerative, Cyclosporine, Elective Surgical Procedures, Female, Humans, Infusions, Intravenous, Length of Stay, Male, Middle Aged, Postoperative Complications, Preoperative Care, Risk Factors, Steroids, Time Factors, Treatment Outcome, Young Adult