Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

After sixty years of continuous use, primaquine remains the only therapy licensed for arresting transmission and relapse of malaria. The US Army developed primaquine for soldiers in a wartime crisis setting. Dosing strategies suited to that narrow population were adopted without modification or validation for the broader population of humans exposed to risk of malaria. The poor suitability of these strategies in populations exhibiting greater vulnerability to hemolytic toxicity among glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient patients has not been addressed. Primaquine requires chemotherapeutic reinvention delivering less threatening doses by leveraging unexplored co-drug synergies.

Original publication

DOI

10.1517/14728214.2012.720252

Type

Journal article

Journal

Expert Opin Emerg Drugs

Publication Date

12/2012

Volume

17

Pages

439 - 444

Keywords

Antimalarials, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Endemic Diseases, Glucosephosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency, Hemolysis, Humans, Malaria, Primaquine, Recurrence