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A key bench mark of successful therapeutic policy implementation, and thus effectiveness, is that the recommended drugs are available at the point of care. Two years after artemether-lumefathrine (AL) was introduced for the management of uncomplicated malaria in Kenya, we carried out a cross-sectional survey to investigate AL availability in government facilities in seven malaria-endemic districts. One of four of the surveyed facilities had none of the four AL weight-specific treatment packs in stock; three of four facilities were out of stock of at least one weight-specific AL pack, leading health workers to prescribe a range of inappropriate alternatives. The shortage was in large part caused by a delayed procurement process. National ministries of health and the international community must address the current shortcomings facing antimalarial drug supply to the public sector.

Type

Journal article

Journal

Am J Trop Med Hyg

Publication Date

05/2009

Volume

80

Pages

737 - 738

Keywords

Antimalarials, Artemether, Lumefantrine Drug Combination, Artemisinins, Cross-Sectional Studies, Drug Combinations, Drug Packaging, Ethanolamines, Fluorenes, Government Regulation, Health Facilities, Health Services Accessibility, Humans, International Cooperation, Kenya, Malaria, Public Health Administration