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Tuberculous meningitis is the most dangerous form of tuberculosis, yet our understanding of disease pathogenesis is based upon studies performed in the 1920s, our diagnostic methods are dependent upon those developed in the 1880 s, and our treatment has advanced little since the introduction of isoniazid in the 1950s. The authors focus this review on three important questions. First, how does Mycobacterium tuberculosis reach the brain? Second, what is the best way of identifying patients who require early empiric antituberculosis therapy? Third, what is the best way of managing tuberculous hydrocephalus?

Original publication

DOI

10.1016/j.ccm.2009.08.018

Type

Journal article

Journal

Clin Chest Med

Publication Date

12/2009

Volume

30

Pages

745 - ix

Keywords

Animals, Antitubercular Agents, Central Nervous System, Diagnostic Techniques, Neurological, Humans, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Tuberculosis, Central Nervous System