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PURPOSE: The Good Intern Programme (GIP) in Sri Lanka has been implemented to bridge the 'theory to practice gap' of doctors preparing for their internship. This paper evaluates the impact of a 2-day peer-delivered Acute Care Skills Training (ACST) course as part of the GIP. STUDY DESIGN: The ACST course was developed by an interprofessional faculty, including newly graduated doctors awaiting internship (pre-intern), focusing on the recognition and management of common medical and surgical emergencies. Course delivery was entirely by pre-intern doctors to their peers. Knowledge was evaluated by a pre- and post-course multiple choice test. Participants' confidence (post-course) and 12 acute care skills (pre- and post-course) were assessed using Likert scale-based questions. A subset of participants provided feedback on the peer learning experience. RESULTS: Seventeen courses were delivered by a faculty consisting of eight peer trainers over 4 months, training 320 participants. The mean (SD) multiple choice questionnaire score was 71.03 (13.19) pre-course compared with 77.98 (7.7) post-course (p<0.05). Increased overall confidence in managing ward emergencies was reported by 97.2% (n=283) of respondents. Participants rated their post-course skills to be significantly higher (p<0.05) than pre-course in all 12 assessed skills. Extended feedback on the peer learning experience was overwhelmingly positive and 96.5% would recommend the course to a colleague. CONCLUSIONS: A peer-delivered ACST course was extremely well received and can improve newly qualified medical graduates' knowledge, skills and confidence in managing medical and surgical emergencies. This peer-based model may have utility beyond pre-interns and beyond Sri Lanka.

Original publication

DOI

10.1136/postgradmedj-2016-134718

Type

Journal article

Journal

Postgrad Med J

Publication Date

10/2017

Volume

93

Pages

592 - 596

Keywords

acute care, clinical skills, education and learning, patient safety, peer learning, Clinical Competence, Critical Care, Educational Measurement, Humans, Internship and Residency, Models, Educational, Peer Review, Professional Practice Gaps, Program Development, Program Evaluation, Sri Lanka, United Kingdom