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Objective: The objective of this study is to describe the characteristics of in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) attempts, the perspectives of junior doctors involved in those attempts and the use of do not attempt resuscitation (DNAR) orders. Methods: A cross-sectional telephone survey aimed at intern doctors working in all medical/surgical wards in government hospitals. Interns were interviewed based on the above objective. Results: A total of 42 CPR attempts from 82 hospitals (338 wards) were reported, 3 of which were excluded as the participating doctor was unavailable for interview. 16 (4.7%) wards had at least 1 patient with an informal DNAR order. 42 deaths were reported. 8 deaths occurred without a known resuscitation attempt, of which 6 occurred on wards with an informal DNAR order in place. 39 resuscitations were attempted. Survival at 24 h was 2 (5.1%). In 5 (13%) attempts, CPR was the only intervention reported. On 25 (64%) occasions, doctors were "not at all" or "only a little bit surprised" by the arrest. Conclusions: CPR attempts before death in hospitals across Sri Lanka is prevalent. DNAR use remains uncommon.

Original publication

DOI

10.4103/ijccm.IJCCM_314_17

Type

Journal article

Journal

Indian J Crit Care Med

Publication Date

12/2017

Volume

21

Pages

865 - 868

Keywords

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, critical care, do not attempt cardiopulmonary resuscitation, resource-limited, resuscitation