Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

A new national research project to study the effects of emerging mutations in SARS-CoV-2 will be launched with £2.5 million funding from UK Research and Innovation (UKRI).

The ‘G2P-UK’ National Virology Consortium* will study how mutations in the virus affect key outcomes such as:

  • how transmissible it is
  • the severity of COVID-19 it causes
  • the effectiveness of vaccines and treatments.

The Fodor Lab (Sir William Dunn School of Pathology) and the Grimes Lab (Nuffield Department of Medicine) are pleased to be part of this project through their collaboration on the SARS-CoV-2 RNA polymerase. Specifically, they will be addressing how emerging mutations in the SARS-CoV-2 replicase genes affect the ability of the virus to replicate its RNA genome and, in collaboration with the other partners in the consortium, how these changes impact the properties of the virus, such as transmissibility, severity of the disease it causes and the immune responses it triggers.

The full story is available on the UKRI website

Similar stories

World’s largest clinical trial for COVID-19 treatments expands internationally

News

The Randomised Evaluation of COVID-19 Therapy (RECOVERY) Trial, the world’s largest clinical trial for COVID-19 treatments, has now expanded internationally with Indonesia and Nepal among the first countries to join and recruited to RECOVERY International. NDM's Peter Horby, Professor of Emerging Infectious Diseases and Global Health, and Joint Chief Investigator for the trial, said ‘The RECOVERY trial has been an enormous success, enrolling over 36,000 patients and delivering clear results on six treatments already. By building on this success through international partnership we can speed up the assessment of novel treatments, increase the global relevance of the trial results, build capacity, and reduce wasted efforts on small uninformative studies".

Exscientia and the University of Oxford announce partnership to develop treatments for Alzheimer’s disease

News

Exscientia, the leading AI Drug Discovery company, has today announced its collaboration with the Alzheimer’s Research UK Oxford Drug Discovery Institute (ARUK-ODDI) to develop medicines targeting neuroinflammation for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD).

Tocilizumab reduces deaths in patients hospitalised with COVID-19

News

The Randomised Evaluation of COVID-19 Therapy (RECOVERY) has demonstrated that an anti-inflammatory treatment, tocilizumab, reduces the risk of death when given to hospitalised patients with severe COVID-19.

Common asthma treatment reduces need for hospitalisation in COVID-19 patients, study suggests

News

Early treatment with a medication commonly used to treat asthma appears to significantly reduce the need for urgent care and hospitalisation in people with COVID-19, researchers at the University of Oxford have found.

Oxford Cancer Centre appoints Professor Tim Elliot as new co-director

News

The CRUK Oxford Centre is pleased to announce the appointment of Professor Tim Elliot as its new co-Director. Tim has recently joined the Nuffield Department of Medicine and Oriel College as the Kidani Professor of Immuno-Oncology. He re-joins the Oxford community from Southampton University, having previously completed his undergraduate degree in Biochemistry at Balliol and subsequently holding a Professorial post at the Weatherall Institute for Molecular Medicine.

Lateral flow devices detect most infectious COVID-19 cases and could allow a safer relaxation of the current lockdown

News

Researchers from NDM's Big Data Institute working with Public Health England and NHS Test and Trace, have used Test and Trace data to find out why some individuals pass COVID-19 on to their contacts more easily than others, and if lateral flow tests are sufficient in detecting those who are most infectious