A new Cancer Research grant will help them develop early detection methods for one of the leading causes of cancer death in the UK.

Deborah Goberdhan and Elizabeth Bird-Lieberman from the Translational Gastroenterology Unit of the Experimental Medicine Division, John Radcliffe Hospital, have been awarded a Cancer Research UK Primer grant of £100,000 to study ‘Serum extracellular vesicle signatures as biomarkers for non-invasive early detection of oesophageal adencarcinoma

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