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The pioneering work of members of the University, including research into tackling the Coronavirus pandemic, has been recognised in The Queen's Birthday Honours List.

NDM Researchers recognised in Queen’s Birthday Honours

Recognised for their research and contributions to tackling the COVID-19 pandemic:

Sarah Gilbert, Professor of Vaccinology, who becomes a Dame Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (DBE), for services to Science and Public Health. She is the Oxford Project Leader for ChAdOx1 nCoV-19, a vaccine against the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, which is now in use in many countries around the world.

Adrian Hill, Director of the Jenner Institute and Lakshmi Mittal and Family Professor of Vaccinology, who becomes an honorary Knight Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (KBE), for services to Science and Public Health. He has been a key member of the team that designed and developed the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine at the University’s Jenner Institute with the Oxford Vaccine Group.

Peter Horby, Director of the Pandemic Sciences Centre, and Professor of Emerging and Infectious Diseases and Global Health, who becomes a Knight Bachelor for services to Medical Research. He co-leads the UK Randomised Evaluation of COVID-19 therapy (RECOVERY) trial, the largest randomised controlled trial of COVID-19 treatments in the world.

Catherine Green, Head of the Nuffield Department of Medicine's Clinical Biomanufacturing Facility and Associate Professor at the Wellcome Centre for Human Genetics, who is appointed as an Officer of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (OBE), for services to Science and Public Health. Her team at the Clinical Biomanufacturing Facility has been an integral part of the University’s development of a ChAdOx1 vectored vaccine against the SARS-CoV-2 virus, in partnership with AstraZeneca.

Teresa Lambe, Associate Professor at the Jenner Institute, who is appointed as an honorary Officer of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (OBE), for services to Science and Public Health. She is one of the Principal Investigators overseeing the University’s Covid-19 vaccine programme.

Guy Thwaites, Professor of Infectious Diseases, is appointed a Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) for services to public health and UK/Vietnam relations. Professor Thwaites is Director of the Oxford Clinical Research Unit/Wellcome Programme in Vietnam, which studies emerging viral infections as well as conditions including malaria, tuberculosis and antimicrobial drug resistance. His personal research focuses on severe bacterial infections.

Professor Derrick Crook has been recognised for services to microbiology during the pandemic with an Honorary OBE.  Amongst several contributions, Professor Crook led the Oxford University team that standardised testing for new diagnostics kits in the UK. Together with Sir David Stuart, he created and is now director of the Oxford University high throughput serology platform, which reports data on anti-viral immunity in the UK population to the Office of National Statistics.  The serology platform is part of a strategic partnership collaboration between the University of Oxford and ThermoFisher Scientific.

Professor Louise Richardson, Vice-Chancellor of the University of Oxford, said, ‘I am absolutely delighted by the recognition of our extraordinary colleagues who have worked so creatively and so tirelessly to develop a vaccine, and therapeutics, to protect us all from COVID-19. They and the teams that have supported them are saving lives around the world every day. We are all deeply proud of them.’

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