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Every other week, estimates of antibody positivity rates are published in Office for National Statistics bulletins - summarised below.

Also see this blog explaining more about Antibodies and Immunity – how do they relate to one another?

16 September - Coronavirus (COVID-19) Infection Survey antibody data for the UK

  • In England, it is estimated that over 9 in 10 adults, or 93.6% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 92.5% to 94.5%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2, the specific virus that causes coronavirus (COVID-19), on a blood test in the week beginning 23 August 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
  • In Wales, it is estimated that over 9 in 10 adults, or 91.2% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 89.5% to 92.7%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week beginning 23 August 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
  • In Northern Ireland, it is estimated that over 9 in 10 adults, or 91.9% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 88.4% to 94.0%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week beginning 23 August 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
  • In Scotland, it is estimated that over 9 in 10 adults, or 93.3% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 91.9% to 94.4%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week beginning 23 August 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
  • Across all UK countries, the percentage of adults testing positive for antibodies increased or remained high for all age groups in the week beginning 23 August 2021; antibody positivity for those aged 16 to 24 years is increasing steadily across all four UK countries, with estimates ranging between 86.9% and 88.7% for that age group across the UK. 

1 SeptemberCoronavirus (COVID-19) Infection Survey antibody data for the UK

  • In England, it is estimated that over 9 in 10 adults, or 94.1% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 93.1% to 95.0%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2, the specific virus that causes coronavirus (COVID-19), on a blood test in the week beginning 9 August 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
  • In Wales, it is estimated that over 9 in 10 adults, or 92.0% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 90.3% to 93.4%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week beginning 9 August 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
  • In Northern Ireland, it is estimated that 9 in 10 adults, or 90.4% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 86.7% to 92.9%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week beginning 9 August 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
  • In Scotland, it is estimated that over 9 in 10 adults, or 93.6% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 92.3% to 94.7%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week beginning 9 August 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
  • Across all four countries of the UK, there is a clear pattern between vaccination and testing positive for COVID-19 antibodies but the detection of antibodies alone is not a precise measure of the immunity protection given by vaccination.

19 August - Coronavirus (COVID-19) Infection Survey antibody data for the UK

  • In England, it is estimated that over 9 in 10 adults, or 94.2% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 93.2% to 95.1%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2, the specific virus that causes coronavirus (COVID-19), on a blood test in the week beginning 26 July 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
  • In Wales, it is estimated that over 9 in 10 adults, or 93.2% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 91.8% to 94.5%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week beginning 26 July 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
  • In Northern Ireland, it is estimated that around 9 in 10 adults, or 89.1% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 85.0% to 92.0%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week beginning 26 July 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
  • In Scotland, it is estimated that over 9 in 10 adults, or 93.5% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 92.2% to 94.6%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week beginning 26 July 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
  • Across all four countries of the UK, there is a clear pattern between vaccination and testing positive for COVID-19 antibodies but the detection of antibodies alone is not a precise measure of the immunity protection given by vaccination.

 

4 AugustCoronavirus (COVID-19) Infection Survey antibody data for the UK

  • In England, it is estimated that over 9 in 10 adults, or 93.6% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 92.5% to 94.5%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2, the specific virus that causes coronavirus (COVID-19), on a blood test in the week beginning 12 July 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
  • In Wales, it is estimated that over 9 in 10 adults, or 93.2% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 91.7% to 94.4%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week beginning 12 July 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
  • In Northern Ireland, it is estimated that around 9 in 10 adults, or 90.7% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 87.4% to 93.3%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week beginning 12 July 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
  • In Scotland, it is estimated that over 9 in 10 adults, or 92.5% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 91.0% to 93.7%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week beginning 12 July 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
  • Across all four countries of the UK, there is a clear pattern between vaccination and testing positive for COVID-19 antibodies but the detection of antibodies alone is not a precise measure of the immunity protection given by vaccination.

21 JulyCoronavirus (COVID-19) Infection Survey antibody data for the UK

  • In England, it is estimated that around 9 in 10 adults, or 91.9% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 90.5% to 93.0%) would have tested positive for antibodies against coronavirus (COVID-19) - SARS-CoV-2 - on a blood test in the week beginning 28 June 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
  • In Wales, it is estimated that around 9 in 10 adults, or 92.6% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 91.0% to 94.0%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week beginning 28 June 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
  • In Northern Ireland, it is estimated that 9 in 10 adults, or 90.0% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 87.5% to 92.3%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week beginning 28 June 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
  • In Scotland, it is estimated that nearly 9 in 10 adults, or 88.6% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 86.7% to 90.3%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week beginning 28 June 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
  • Across all four countries of the UK, there is a clear pattern between vaccination and testing positive for COVID-19 antibodies but the detection of antibodies alone is not a precise measure of the immunity protection given by vaccination.

 

7 July Coronavirus (COVID-19) Infection Survey antibody data for the UK

    • In England, it is estimated that around 9 in 10 adults, or 89.8% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 88.2% to 91.3%) would have tested positive for antibodies against coronavirus (COVID-19) - SARS-CoV-2 - on a blood test in the week beginning 14 June 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
    • In Wales, it is estimated that 9 in 10 adults, or 91.8% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 90.1% to 93.3%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week beginning 14 June 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
    • In Northern Ireland, it is estimated that close to 9 in 10 adults, or 87.2% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 84.2% to 90.2%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week beginning 14 June 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
    • In Scotland, it is estimated that over 8 in 10 adults, or 84.7% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 82.4% to 86.9%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week beginning 14 June 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
    • Across all four countries of the UK, there is a clear pattern between vaccination and testing positive for COVID-19 antibodies but the detection of antibodies alone is not a precise measure of the immunity protection given by vaccination.

 

22 June Coronavirus (COVID-19) Infection Survey antibody data for the UK

  • In England, it is estimated that over 8 in 10 adults, or 86.6% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 84.6% to 88.5%) would have tested positive for antibodies against coronavirus – SARS-CoV-2 – on a blood test in the week beginning 7 June 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
  • In Wales, it is estimated that over 8 in 10 adults, or 88.7% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 86.6% to 90.9%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week beginning 7 June 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
  • In Northern Ireland, it is estimated that over 8 in 10 adults, or 85.4% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 82.0% to 88.5%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week beginning 7 June 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
  • In Scotland, an estimated 8 in 10 adults, or 79.1% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 76.3% to 81.8%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week beginning 7 June 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
  • Across all four countries of the UK, there is a clear pattern between vaccination and testing positive for COVID-19 antibodies but the detection of antibodies alone is not a precise measure of the immunity protection given by vaccination.

  

9 June Coronavirus (COVID-19) Infection Survey antibody data for the UK

  • In England, an estimated 8 in 10 adults, or 80.3% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 77.3% to 83.2%) would have tested positive for antibodies against coronavirus – SARS-CoV-2 – on a blood test in the week beginning 17 May 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.

    In Wales, an estimated 8 in 10 adults, or 82.7% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 79.6% to 85.6%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week beginning 17 May 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.

    In Northern Ireland, an estimated 8 in 10 adults, or 79.9% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 76.3% to 84.4%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week beginning 17 May 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.

    In Scotland, an estimated 7 in 10 adults, or 72.6% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 68.9% to 76.3%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week beginning 17 May 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.

    Across all four countries of the UK, there is a clear pattern between vaccination and testing positive for COVID-19 antibodies but the detection of antibodies alone is not a precise measure of the immunity protection given by vaccination.

     

26 MayCoronavirus (COVID-19) Infection Survey antibody data for the UK

  • In England, an estimated 3 in 4 adults, or 75.9% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 72.6% to 79.6%) would have tested positive for antibodies against the coronavirus – SARS-CoV-2 – on a blood test in the week beginning 3 May 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
  • In Wales, an estimated 3 in 4 adults, or 76.6% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 72.8% to 80.7%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week beginning 3 May 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
  • In Northern Ireland, an estimated 3 in 4 adults, or 75.0% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 70.3% to 80.5%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week beginning 3 May 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
  • In Scotland, an estimated 7 in 10 adults, or 68.6% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 64.8% to 73.1%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week beginning 3 May 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
  • Across all four countries of the UK, there is a clear pattern between vaccination and testing positive for COVID-19 antibodies but the detection of antibodies alone is not a precise measure of the immunity protection given by vaccination.

13 May Coronavirus (COVID-19) Infection Survey antibody data for the UK

  • In England, an estimated 7 in 10 adults or 69.3% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 65.6% to 73.9%) would have tested positive for antibodies against the coronavirus – SARS-CoV-2 – on a blood test in the week beginning 19 April 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
  • In Wales, an estimated 6 in 10 adults, or 63.2% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 58.8% to 68.3%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week beginning 19 April 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
  • In Northern Ireland, an estimated 6 in 10 adults, or 63.5% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 57.6% to 71.2%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week beginning 19 April 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
  • In Scotland, an estimated 6 in 10 adults, or 59.2% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 54.8% to 64.4%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week beginning 19 April 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
  • Across all four countries of the UK, there is a clear pattern between vaccination and testing positive for COVID-19 antibodies but the detection of antibodies alone is not a precise measure of the immunity protection given by vaccination.
  • Weekly data show a reduction in antibody positivity rates among older individuals in early to mid-March 2021. Antibody positivity has since risen again in the older ages. This is likely to reflect the increase in individuals receiving the second dose of their COVID-19 vaccine.

 

28 April Coronavirus (COVID-19) Infection Survey antibody data for the UK

  • In England, an estimated 7 in 10 adults or 68.3% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 63.9% to 73.0%) would have tested positive for antibodies against the coronavirus – SARS-CoV-2 – on a blood test in the week ending 11 April 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
  • In Wales, an estimated 6 in 10 adults, or 61.0% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 55.9% to 66.5%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week ending 11 April 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
  • In Northern Ireland, an estimated 6 in 10 adults, or 62.5% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 56.4% to 70.9%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week ending 11 April 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
  • In Scotland, an estimated 6 in 10 adults, or 57.8% of the adult population (95% credible interval: 52.9% to 63.1%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week ending 11 April 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
  • Across all four countries of the UK, there is a clear pattern between vaccination and testing positive for COVID-19 antibodies but the detection of antibodies alone is not a precise measure of the immunity protection given by vaccination.
  • Weekly data show a reduction in antibody positivity rates among older individuals in early to mid-March 2021. Antibody positivity has since risen again in the older ages. This is likely to reflect the increase in individuals receiving the second dose of their COVID-19 vaccine.

14 April - Coronavirus (COVID-19) Infection Survey antibody data for the UK

      • In England, an estimated 1 in 2 people, or 54.9% of the population (95% credible interval: 49.5% to 60.0%) would have tested positive for antibodies against the coronavirus (COVID-19) – SARS-CoV-2 – on a blood test in the week ending 28 March 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
      • In Wales, an estimated 1 in 2 people, or 49.1% of the population (95% credible interval: 43.2% to 54.9%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week ending 28 March 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
      • In Northern Ireland, an estimated 1 in 2 people, or 54.5% of the population (95% credible interval: 47.8% to 64.0%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week ending 28 March 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
      • In Scotland, an estimated 1 in 2 people, or 46.0% of the population (95% credible interval: 40.3% to 51.6%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week ending 28 March 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
      • Weekly data show a reduction in antibody positivity rates among older individuals in recent weeks, likely because the data do not yet show the impact of second doses of COVID-19 vaccinations; daily modelled antibody estimates by single year of age also show this decline, but also show a more recent increase.

      • Across all four countries of the UK, there is a clear pattern between vaccination and testing positive for COVID-19 antibodies but the detection of antibodies alone is not a precise measure of the immunity protection given by vaccination.

30 MarchCoronavirus (COVID-19) Infection Survey antibody data for the UK

      • In England, an estimated 1 in 2 people, or 54.7% of the population (95% credible interval: 49.3% to 60.5%) would have tested positive for antibodies against the coronavirus – SARS-CoV-2 – on a blood test in the week ending 14 March 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
      • In Wales, an estimated 1 in 2 people, or 50.5% of the population (95% credible interval: 44.2% to 57.2%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week ending 14 March 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
      • In Northern Ireland, an estimated 1 in 2 people, or 49.3% of the population (95% credible interval: 41.8% to 59.7%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week ending 14 March 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
      • In Scotland, an estimated 2 in 5 people, or 42.6% of the population (95% credible interval: 37.1% to 48.6%) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the week ending 14 March 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
      • The data show a reduction in antibody positivity rates among older individuals during the most recent days in the period analysed; this is likely because of people in these prioritised age groups having received their first vaccine dose but not yet their second dose; this does not necessarily mean they have no immunity protection against coronavirus (COVID-19).

      • For the first time, we have included modelled estimates of the number of people who have received at least one dose of a vaccine; across all four countries of the UK there is a clear pattern between vaccination and testing positive for COVID-19 antibodies.

16 March - Coronavirus (COVID-19) Infection Survey antibody data for the UK

      • In England, an estimated 1 in 3 people, or 34.6% of the population (95% confidence interval: 34.0% to 35.3%), would have tested positive for antibodies against the coronavirus - SARS-CoV-2 - on a blood test in the 28 days up to 3 March 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
      • In Wales, an estimated 1 in 3 people (95% confidence interval: 1 in 4 to 1 in 3) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the 28 days up to 3 March 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
      • In Northern Ireland, an estimated 1 in 3 people (95% confidence interval: 1 in 4 to 1 in 3) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the 28 days up to 3 March 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
      • In Scotland, an estimated 1 in 4 people (95% confidence interval: 1 in 5 to 1 in 4) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the 28 days up to 3 March 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
      • The percentage of people testing positive for COVID-19 antibodies was higher for those aged 70 years and over in England, Wales and Scotland.

2 March - Coronavirus (COVID-19) Infection Survey antibody data for the UK

      • In England, an estimated 1 in 4 people (95% confidence interval: 1 in 4 to 1 in 4) would have tested positive for antibodies against the coronavirus - SARS-CoV-2 - on a blood test in the 28 days up to 11 February 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
      • In Wales, an estimated 1 in 6 people (95% confidence interval: 1 in 7 to 1 in 5) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the 28 days up to 11 February 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
      • In Northern Ireland, an estimated 1 in 6 people (95% confidence interval: 1 in 8 to 1 in 5) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the 28 days up to 11 February 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
      • In Scotland, an estimated 1 in 8 people (95% confidence interval: 1 in 9 to 1 in 7) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the 28 days up to 11 February 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
      • The highest percentage of people testing positive for antibodies was in those aged 80 years and over in England, in the 28 days up to 11 February 2021.

16 February - Coronavirus (COVID-19) Infection Survey, antibody data for the UK

      • In England, an estimated 1 in 5 people (95% confidence interval: 1 in 6 to 1 in 5) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the 28 days up to 1 February 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
      • In Wales, an estimated 1 in 7 people (95% confidence interval: 1 in 8 to 1 in 6) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the 28 days up to 1 February 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
      • In Northern Ireland, an estimated 1 in 7 people (95% confidence interval: 1 in 10 to 1 in 6) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the 28 days up to 1 February 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
      • In Scotland, an estimated 1 in 9 people (95% confidence interval: 1 in 10 to 1 in 8) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the 28 days up to 1 February 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past or have been vaccinated.
      • The highest percentages of people testing positive for antibodies were those aged 80 years and over in England, those aged 16 to 24 years in Wales and Scotland, and those aged 25 to 34 years in Northern Ireland, in the 28 days up to 1 February 2021.

3 February - Coronavirus (COVID-19) Infection Survey: antibody data for the UK: 3 February 2021

      • In England, an estimated 1 in 7 people (95% confidence interval: 1 in 7 to 1 in 6) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the 28 days up to 18 January 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past.
      • In Wales, an estimated 1 in 9 people (95% confidence interval: 1 in 12 to 1 in 7) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the 28 days up to 18 January 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past.
      • In Northern Ireland, an estimated 1 in 11 people (95% confidence interval: 1 in 17 to 1 in 7) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the 28 days up to 18 January 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past.
      • In Scotland, an estimated 1 in 10 people (95% confidence interval: 1 in 12 to 1 in 9) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in the 28 days up to 18 January 2021, suggesting they had the infection in the past.
      • The highest percentages of people testing positive for antibodies were those aged 80 years and over in England and Scotland, those aged 16 to 24 years in Wales and those aged 25 to 69 years in Northern Ireland in the 28 days up to 18 January 2021.

19 January - Coronavirus (COVID-19) Infection Survey: antibody data for the UK, January 2021

      • In England, an estimated 1 in 8 people (95% confidence interval: 1 in 9 to 1 in 8) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in December, suggesting they had the infection in the past.
      • In Wales, an estimated 1 in 10 people (95% confidence interval: 1 in 14 to 1 in 8) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in December, suggesting they had the infection in the past.
      • In Northern Ireland, an estimated 1 in 13 people (95% confidence interval: 1 in 28 to 1 in 7) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in December, suggesting they had the infection in the past.
      • In Scotland, an estimated 1 in 11 people (95% confidence interval: 1 in 14 to 1 in 9) would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in December, suggesting they had the infection in the past.

14 December - characteristics of people testing positive for COVID-19 in England and antibody data for the UK: December 2020

      • In England, an estimated 8.7% (95% confidence interval: 8.2% to 9.3%) of people would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in November, suggesting they had the infection in the past; there is substantial variation in antibody positivity between regions, from 12.8% (95% confidence interval: 11.4% to 14.5%) in London compared with 3.9% (95% confidence interval: 2.8% to 5.3%) in the South West.
      • In Wales, an estimated 5.5% (95% confidence interval: 3.6% to 8.0%) of people would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in November, suggesting they had the infection in the past.
      • In Northern Ireland, an estimated 3.3% (95% confidence interval: 1.6% to 6.0%) of people would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in November, suggesting they had the infection in the past.
      • In Scotland, an estimated 7.3% (95% confidence interval: 5.0% to 10.3%) of people would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in November, suggesting they had the infection in the past.

24 November - characteristics of people testing positive for COVID-19 in England and antibody data for the UK: November 2020

Analysis of antibodies evidence from individuals who have had the infection in the past show: 

    • In England, an estimated 6.9% (95% confidence interval: 6.3% to 7.4%) of people would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in October, suggesting they had the infection in the past; there is substantial variation in antibody positivity between regions, from 10.8% (95% confidence interval: 9.3% to 12.5%) in London compared with 3.1% (95% confidence interval: 2.1% to 4.4%) in the South West.
    • In Wales, an estimated 4.1% (95% confidence interval: 2.4% to 6.5%) of people would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in October, suggesting they had the infection in the past.
    • In Northern Ireland, an estimated 2.1% (95% confidence interval: 0.7% to 4.6%) of people would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in October, suggesting they had the infection in the past.
    • In Scotland, an estimated 7.1% (95% confidence interval: 4.6% to 10.4%) of people would have tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 on a blood test in October, suggesting they had the infection in the past.